Summer Newsletter 2018-Idaho Tree Farm

2017-2018
Officers:
President –Russ Hegedus
Idaho Forest Group
(T) 208.255.3250

•  Vice President –
Sean Hammond
(T) 208.610.8754

•  Treasurer –
Steve Cuvala
Idaho Dept. of Lands
(T) 208.245.4551

•  Administrator –
Colleen Meek
ID Tree Farm Progra

admin@idahotreefarm.org

(T) 208.667.4641 Ex 503

2017-2018
District Chairs:

•   District 1 Chair –
Andy Eckberg
Idaho Forest Group
aeckberg@idfg.com

(T) 208.255.3276

•  District 2 Chair –
Tim Schaffer
Bennett Lumber Products
(T) 208.819.1214

•  District 3 Chair –
John Lillehaug
All About Forestry
(T) 208.630.4076

Our annual Fall Field Tour of the Idaho Outstanding Tree Farmer of the Year is scheduled for September 8, 2018. Brian Kroetch will lead us through portions of his 6,000 acres in the Mica Bay Tree Farms area south of Coeur d’Alene. During the day we will view active logging and roads jobs showing how various prescriptions are being used to achieve the desired result on these working forests. We will stop at some of the white pine and larch plantations and discuss reforestation issues that accompany such a large acreage.

Other items to discuss are the challenges of working so closely in the wildland-urban interface near Coeur d’Alene, the relationship Brian has developed with the Idaho Fish & Game Department in helping manage access and game herds on the property, as well as working to combine sustainable forestry with the need for a sustainable income from the harvests.

As always, the tour is free and lunch & seating will be provided.     The plan is to meet on the Mica Bay Land Company Tree Farm property adjacent to Highway 95 about 2 miles west of Coeur d’Alene Lake and Mica Bay around 8:30 that morning.     Coffee, doughnuts, snacks and beverages will be provided by the Idaho Tree Farm Program.

Be sure to dress appropriately for outdoor field conditions and have proper footwear for the woods. We will send out another notice with a map and scheduled itinerary for the day, but if you wish to contact us just email admin@idahotreefarm.org or call our State Administrator Colleen Meek at (208)-667-4641, ext 503.Hope to see you there!

Idaho Tree Farm Program

Fall Field Tour 2018

Kroetch Land and Timber

Coeur d’ Alene, ID

P.O. Box 2659 • Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814 • (T) 208.667.4641, ext 503 • (F) 208.664.0557
www.idahotreefarm.org • admin@idahotreefarm.org

 

Idaho Tree Farm Program Assessment – Coming in 2019

 

Part of being a “Certified” Tree Farm Program is the requirement every 3-5 years of a 3rd party assessment to ensure we are in compliance with all the current certification standards. We have been informed that 2019 will be the next audit/assessment year so we need to begin getting things in motion to be ready.       Early in 2019 officials from the 3rd party organization, Price Waterhouse Coopers, and representatives from our National ATFS office will travel to Idaho and decide on which parcels to visit. Our record keeping and procedures will be checked, but the main thing for member Tree Farmers to address will be your management plans. If you haven’t regularly done so, now would be a good time to locate, dust off, and update as necessary your management plan to ensure it complies with the current certification standards.       If you are unsure or have any questions on any of this, contact your Inspecting Forester or call our state office at 208-667-4641 Ext 503 or email to admin@idahotreefarm.org.
Two Idaho Tree Farm Committee Positions Filled
We are pleased to recognize two volunteers that have agreed to fill spots on our state committee.

Mary Fritz, Certification Chair.       Mary is a long time IDL employee who earlier worked on the Clearwater as a private forestry specialist and has been living in the Silver Valley since moving to Cataldo to fill a position as a private forestry specialist. Currently Mary works as program manager in forest stewardship in CDA.

Matt Engberg, Inspecting Forester Chair. Matt, a University of Idaho graduate, has been a Northwest Management Inc employee from the early 90’s to present.  Matt’s career started out falling snags on a wildland fire crew and then cruising timber, ran planting programs, precommercial thinning programs, timber sale layout & admin along with building roads and installing bridges, working wildland and prescribed fire programs for NMI and last but not least helping with Idaho tree farm on the Palouse.

Welcome aboard and thanks to both of you for stepping up to help our program!

Know Any “Outstanding” Candidates ??
Each year we honor some folks that have gone a bit above and beyond in the care for their land or the improvement of our program.       An Idaho Outstanding Tree Farmer, Inspecting Forester, and Logger is chosen from among our ranks and showcased during our annual meeting at the Family Forest Landowners & Managers Conference in Moscow. We are in the midst right now of choosing our candidates for 2019 so if you know of a particular Tree Farmer, logger, or Inspecting Forester that has gone the extra mile, please let us know.

As we all know the workings of our program and the fine stewardship done on your land doesn’t happen on its own. It takes all of the dedicated volunteers working together and we want to honor those that are in the blue ribbon class. If you know of a particularly well cared for parcel, a logger that goes beyond what is required to make things shine, or an Inspector that is especially helpful to landowners, give us a all or email a note for us to consider them for special recognition.

 

Idaho Forest Products Commission – Sustainable Forestry Tour

 

Each year the Idaho Forest Products Commission (IFPC) puts on a week-long tour for educators covering everything from soup to nuts regarding forestry in Idaho. In the IFPC wordsThey are immersed in the social, economic and ecological aspects of sustainable forestry, and receive proven activities and materials to take back to the classroom.” Our program thinks very highly of this outreach and sponsors an educator each year. Here is some feedback from one of the educators that took part in the 2018 tour:

“The Sustainable Forestry Tour has been the best short-term professional development experience I have taken part in during my 22 years as a teacher.  The Idaho Forest Products Commission (IFPC) team did an outstanding job of handling logistics and being continual educators throughout the tour. I participated in several activities where I plan to use either the teaching strategy or the content of the lesson.  I gained a greater appreciation for our forests and the importance of managing them well. By the end of the tour I found myself wishing I was a lobbyist that could get policymakers to be a part of this tour. I believe the most effective, transformative way to get the information we gained this week into the hands of policy makers would be to have them participate in this tour in its entirety.  Trying to gain the same level of information and appreciation for the information through reading or listening to lobbyists, or even participation in a one-day conference is simply not as effective as being immersed in the activities we did, including touring the facilities and job sites we had the privilege of seeing. I will definitely be recommending this tour to my colleagues in education.  

In addition, my husband, Sean Hammond has been a sawyer for several area logging contractors for most of the last 30 years. This tour gave me a much greater appreciation for the work my husband does and the entire forestry industry.  At each tour stop, I found myself delighted in knowing some of what was being taught because of what Sean has taught me and our children. By the end of the week I found myself with a significant degree of pride in what my he does, his care for the land, and his integrity as now a private one-man logging operation.” 

Thank you Idaho Tree Farm for your sponsorship and participation in this incredible opportunity. 

Sincerely, Virginia Hammond

 

 

Idaho Master Forest Stewards Program Accepting Applications

University of Idaho Extension is seeking candidates for the Idaho Master Forest Stewards (IMFS) program. The Idaho Master Forest Stewards program was co-designed with forest owners to increase participants’ forestry knowledge and skills; enable them to provide educational assistance to forest owners and other groups; and provide a forum for richer peer to peer learning among forest owners. Over 100 people have participated in the program thus far.

Applications for the IMFS program are accepted continually. When we have at least ten applications by August of a given year, we schedule IMFS core sessions for the next. We are very close to reaching that threshold, so if you are currently interested in taking the training in 2019, send an application in August 2018. More information on becoming an Idaho Master Forest Steward and application materials can be downloaded at:

www.uidaho.edu/extension/forestry/panhandle/programs/master-stewards.

The largest portion of the 2019 training would take place during four, one-day sessions held April thru September.

 

Put your Forest Plan into Action

Across the state, the Idaho Department of Lands employs Private Forestry Specialists (PFS) whose primary role is to provide forest landowners with information to help them meet their forest management goals. Our PFSs provide planning advice, assess insect and disease threats and design a variety of practices to help you manage your land. Some of these practices include thinning, tree planting, forest health improvement and fuel breaks. We collaborate with a wide variety of resource professionals and are long-time and strong supporters of the Idaho Tree Farm Program.

For landowner’s writing a forest management plan, IDL’s Forest Stewardship Program staff collaborated with the Idaho Tree Farm Program and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to develop the One Plan Template. Each of these three programs require a management plan and by working together, the One Plan allows a landowner to easily sign up for all three programs.

The Idaho Department of Lands administers the Forest Stewardship Program, a national program that provides funding to IDL to assist forest landowners. To become a Forest Steward, landowners must develop a management plan. The benefit of participating in Idaho’s Forest Stewardship Program includes a free site visit every five years and access to conference and educational opportunities. Many of our staff are also Tree Farm Inspectors that can enroll you in the Tree Farm Program.

You will find the One Plan Template on the Idaho Department of Lands Forestry Assistance webpage https://www.idl.idaho.gov/

If you need advice or technical assistance, you can call your nearest Private Forest Specialist for an appointment. Our PFSs can be contacted at anyone of these locations:

For more information on the Idaho Forest Stewardship Program contact Mary Fritz, mfritz@idl.idaho.gov or phone 208-666-8667.

Wanted: Email Addresses
We are always looking for ways to reduce clutter and streamline our process. If you are currently receiving your Tree Farm newsletter by mail and would like to switch to electronic, please contact us and have your email address listed as your preferred method of contact. Just email to admin@idahotreefarm.org or call Colleen at 208-667-4641, Ext 503
Idaho “One Plan” for Tree Farm, Stewardship and NRCS

Mary Fritz, Forest Stewardship Program Manager, Idaho Dept of Lands

 

Brown Needles – Are My Trees Dying? 

Chris Schnepf – Area Extension Educator, Forestry

Most people love healthy green tree foliage. When a tree’s foliage becomes less green, or worse yet brown, people are understandably concerned about tree and forest health.

Extension offices across Idaho frequently get calls about brown conifer needles, especially in the fall and spring. Brown needle causes vary from normal tree physiology to a wide range of insects and diseases. Unless the whole tree is brown, some brown needles are not necessarily a problem. 

Fall needle drop. Deciduous trees drop all their leaves every fall. But non-deciduous conifers drop leaves too – they just don’t drop them all every year. Older conifer needles are less photosynthetically efficient than younger needles, as they are often shaded by newer foliage. Conifers drop these older needles because those needles take more energy from the tree to stay green than the tree gets in return.

Trees vary in how many needles they keep on the tree. Some conifer species can keep 4 or more age-classes of needles. Needle drop on lodgepole, ponderosa, and white pines is often most noticeable, because every fall, three-year needles turn brown and eventually drop. If a pine had particularly good growth 3 years ago, putting on abundant needles, that needle-drop can look dramatic, but dropping those old needles helps the tree.

Needle diseases visible in spring. A variety of diseases infect needles. The most commonly noticed needle diseases are those visible on pines in the spring. It is usually worse in the lower parts of younger trees and in draws or low-lying areas where humidity is higher. One of the most dramatic examples is Lophodermella concolor, which sometimes affects whole mountainsides of lodgepole pine at high elevations. Sometimes in the spring it can look like a whole lodgepole forest is dying, until the new growth comes on shortly thereafter. Most pine needle diseases are worse in the lower and interior parts of the tree – the least efficient needles on the tree. Sometimes they look terrible, but trees almost always survive needle diseases.

An exception occurs for trees planted from seed sources which were too far removed from the site to be adapted to it (“off-site” trees). These trees are often more dramatically affected by or even killed by needle diseases. Therefore, needle diseases could be a way to monitor changing climate. If needle diseases are killing many naturally regenerated trees, it may be time to consider assisting the migration of better adapted seed sources to that site.

Brown branch tips. Various insects and diseases can turn individual branch tips brown. Some of the most common issues with pines are gouty pitch midge, pine shoot borer, Diplodia tip blight, and western gall rust. Some small bark beetle species also kill Douglas-fir branch tips. These organisms usually only kill a few branches or tips – they almost never kill a tree, unless it is seedling-size. They are generally considered non-economic pests in the context of forest management. 

Larch commonly has needle issues in the spring. Western larch needle issues are usually caused by three factors: larch needle cast, larch needle blight, and larch case bearer. Larch needle cast starts as small yellow-brown spots which grow and eventually cause the whole needle to turn brown and fall off the tree. Larch needle blight wilts whole clusters of needle downward (they look melted, like a Salvador Dali painting), eventually turning them brown. Larch case bearers are tiny insects that mine the inside of needles, turning them straw-colored

(continued on next page)

 

Brown Needles – Are My Trees Dying?

(continued from previous page)

Good Neighbor Authority Field Trip

August 24-25 Priest River Experimental Forest

The Inland Empire Society of American Foresters (IESAF) would like to announce a two-day field trip to the Priest Lake Ranger District and the Priest River Experimental Forest (PREF).       The dates are Friday, August 24 and Saturday August 25th, 2018. On Friday, the field tour will look at and discuss the results of the Good Neighbor Authority in action. The US Forest Service and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) have pioneered this effort, and this will be a terrific opportunity for Tree Farm members, landowners and friends to see the first-hand results. The Good Neighbor Authority was recently expanded to include authorization for transportation that was not included in the original legislation. This new authority will be very helpful to expand and make the program more efficient and economical. This tour will begin at 10:00 a.m. by meeting to consolidate vehicles at the PREF. We will return to PREF for an evening meal and program for those that want to stay over for the Saturday tour of the Experimental Forest.

The Friday evening program will feature Dr. Russ Graham discussing the origins and history of PREF. Saturday’s field tour of the Experimental Forest will be a walking tour of the research projects in close proximity of the facilities at PREF. The travel route is on trails and roads covering generally flat and gentle terrain.

What to do if you are interested in possibly attending: Send an e-mail to inlandempiresaf@gmail.com stating your interest in one or both days, lodging, and meals by August 10th. You will be placed on our e-mail list for this field tour (only). You will receive a registration response with all of the final cost information and charges for your selected portion of tour.

and crinkling the tips. It is quite possible to have all three operating in the same larch tree at once. Some years are worse than others, but these maladies can look dramatic, particularly case-bearer. Luckily, none of these usually kill the tree. The wonderful thing about larch (in addition to root disease tolerance) is that it continues to grow new needles through the growing season. Trees that look brown in the spring are usually re-needled by mid-summer. The only impact might be slightly reduced stem diameter growth. 

Bark beetles? Root disease? If both new and old needles are not a healthy green, a tree is probably being affected by something other than needle maladies. If the whole tree fades over a period of years, it is likely root disease. If the whole tree turns brown within 6 months, it is more likely bark beetles. But if the symptoms are more like those described previously in this article, the tree will likely survive. Consider waiting before starting a salvage sale or cutting such trees for firewood.

If you are not sure, bring a fresh sample (and/or perhaps photos of the tree) into your local University of Idaho Extension or Idaho Department of Lands office.

 

IDL and US Forest Service are currently conducting the annual aerial survey of Idaho’s forest lands, and it looks like 2018 will be a big year for fir engraver (Scolytus ventralis). Fir engraver is a native bark beetle that attacks grand fir of all sizes. Trees that are under stress are most vulnerable. The dry weather during the summer of 2017 resulted in a surge of requests for technical assistance from private forest landowners in the spring of 2018. Minimize fir engraver damage by growing grand fir on suitable sites, avoiding drier aspects and rocky soils.

IDL personnel also received many calls from landowners reporting dead & dying Douglas-fir saplings. We have been seeing an increase in the occurrence of secondary bark beetles in small Douglas-fir. Scolytus monticolae and Scolytus unispinosus (Douglas-fir engraver) are minor bark beetle species that usually do not cause many problems. The dry weather in 2016 / 2017 is probably the main cause of this mortality. Most of the damage has been on sites with rocky or thin soils. As with fir engraver, maintaining proper density is important, especially if the soil is well drained or rocky.

Aerial observers are also reporting needle blight on western larch. This disease will quickly turn the needles red, and they will wilt and remain on the short spur. The disease is most common when conditions are wet in the spring when the needles are expanding. It rarely kills older trees, but can be mistaken for other, more serious problems. Fungicide sprays are rarely warranted, except for isolated small trees in ornamental settings. Increasing airflow (thinning) can lower infection by reducing humidity during the infection period (shoot elongation).

Aerial observers in southern Idaho report some Douglas-fir tussock moth defoliation in grand fir and Douglas-fir on the Payette NF southwest of Cascade Reservoir. Parts of the Boise and Sawtooth NF are also experiencing defoliation. Western spruce budworm is also defoliating grand fir and subalpine fir in parts of the Payette NF. With defoliating insects such as tussock moth and spruce budworm, selecting for nonhosts or less preferred hosts is a key management tactic. Pines and western larch are not commonly damaged by these defoliators. Damage is often worse in dense, multi storied stands with susceptible understory. Larvae feeding in taller firs or spruce will fall down on young trees, often causing severe defoliation. Grand fir is often more severely defoliated than Douglas-fir, so during harvest or thinning operations, grand fir should be discouraged as a leave tree.

IDL is receiving reports of “shiny, sticky” grand fir foliage and even broadleaf shrubs in the understory beneath grand fir. In 2013, there was a widespread outbreak of the balsam twig aphid (Mindarus abietis), a sucking insect that creates “honeydew,” a sticky, sugary secretion, which covers the needles and drips onto foliage below. This honeydew attracts attention from landowners, but trees are rarely seriously damaged. This honeydew is often a food source for insects such as wasps, yellow jackets and bald faced hornets, which can annoy woods workers. A good link to this insect can be found at this link:

https://tidcf.nrcan.gc.ca/insects/factsheet/5549. 

Late July through November is the ideal time to conduct thinning or other management activity in pines to minimize damage from the pine engraver (Ips pini). There is often temptation to time harvests or thinning during the winter through spring due to access, logistics or other reasons. Creating pine slash during these times can cause unwanted damage. Creating slash during the summer allows it to dry out and become unsuitable for overwintering adults and damage is often avoided.

Forest Health Updates, Idaho Department of Lands

Tom Eckberg. Forest Health Program Manager Idaho Dept of Lands

 

Events to Highlight

Aug 25-25, 2018 – Good Neighbor Authority Field Tour, Priest River, ID

Sept 8, 2018 – Fall Field Tour, Kroetch Land & Timber, CDA, ID

Oct 18, 2018 – Idaho Tree Farm Committee Meeting, CDA, ID

Welcome New Members!

 

The Idaho Tree Farm Committee extends a special welcome to the 4 newest Idaho Tree Farm Program’s certified members.     Thank you to the District Chairs and Inspecting Foresters for promoting membership in the Idaho Tree Farm Program through the American Tree Farm System®.

As a current member, and a steward of the land, we appreciate your current support of the program and your management of the forestland for pride and pleasure. Thank you for your continued commitment to protecting watersheds and wildlife habitat, conserving soil and, at the same time, producing the wood America needs and uses.

Tree Farm Member Acreage County Inspecting Forester
Gale Cope 30 Latah Robbie Easley
Richard & Maryann Fryer 146 Idaho David Summers
Greg & Janis Worch 20 Benewah Jim Nichols
Tim Andersen 17 Idaho John Lillehaug

 

Stay Informed…..

In case you are ever wondering what is going on at the committee level, our Minutes are now being posted on the Idaho Tree Farm Program website. Just log onto our website for Minutes of previous sessions, contact information, upcoming events, and other news of note to help you in your Tree Farm endeavors.

 

 

We’re on the Web!

Learn more at:

www.idahotreefarm.org

 

About Our Organization…

The purpose of the Idaho Tree Farm Program is to promote better forest management among nonindustrial forest owners. The vehicle for achieving this aim is the American Tree Farm System® (ATFS), sponsored nationally by the American Forest Foundation (AFF), state wide by the Idaho SFI State Implementation Committee (SFI SIC), and administered by the Idaho Tree Farm Committee (State Committee).

 

We hope to see you September 8 for our Fall Field Tour on the Kroetch Family / Mica Bay Land Company Tree Farms

 

Spring Newsletter 2018

Spring 2018
Idaho Tree Farm Program
P.O. Box 2659 • Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814 • (T) 208.667.4641, ext 503 • (F) 208.664.0557
www.idahotreefarm.org • admin@idahotreefarm.org
Idaho Tree Farm Program

Outstanding Tree Farmer 2018

Kroetch Land and Timber

Coeur d’ Alene, ID

 

The annual meeting of our Idaho program was held March 26 at the Family Forest Landowners Conference in Moscow. Turnout was great with over 80 Tree Farmers and guests in attendance.     Program President Russ Hegedus gave a short recap of the program and what’s new in Tree Farming then turned to our program awards for 2018. This year the award for Outstanding Idaho Tree Farmer of the Year went to Brian Kroetch of Kroetch Land & Timber and Mica Bay Land Company.

 

Brian’s family has a long history in forestry, starting with roots in logging & milling in Germany before some of his ancestors immigrated to America and incorporated in the area near Coeur d’Alene in 1921.     Over the years they have continued to acquire land and are over 21,000 acres today. Working on a sustained basis, they grow and harvest 5-6 million board feet annually. Brian says, “We are particularly proud of operating a profitable business for the family in a way that’s both sustainable and environmentally sound”.     Congratulations to Brian and his family!

 

2017-2018
Officers
•   President –

Russ Hegedus
Idaho Forest Group
(T) 208.255.3250

•  Vice President –
Sean Hammond
(T) 208.610.8754

•  Treasurer –
Steve Cuvala
Idaho Dept. of Lands
(T) 208.245.4551

•  Administrator –
Colleen Meek
ID Tree Farm Program

admin@idahotreefarm.org

(T) 208.667.4641

2017-2018
District Chairs:

•   District 1 Chair –
Andy Eckberg
Idaho Forest Group
aeckberg@idfg.com

(T) 208.255.3276

•  District 2 Chair –
Tim Schaffer
Bennett Lumber Products
(T) 208.819.1214

•  District 3 Chair –
John Lillehaug
All About Forestry
(T) 208.630.4076

 

 

 

Left to right – Vice President Sean Hammond, President Russ Hegedus, Brian Kroetch, Dana Kroetch.

 

ITFC Annual Meeting (continued from page 1)

 

Our Idaho Outstanding Logger of the year for 2018 is Luke Peterson. Luke and his wife Amy operate Northwoods Forestry near Sandpoint. His fine work may be familiar to many of you from our Fall Tour a couple years back as he had done much of the logging for the Wood family, our 2016 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year. Luke began his career in 2004 with just a saw and skidder. He has since expanded the operation to include a processor, buncher, several skidding rigs and a full-time employee.       Working with private landowners all around North Idaho, his gives a great deal of attention to leaving a site better than when he entered it. Good job Luke!
L-R – Northwoods crew member Matt Henry, truck driver Robert Laude (Woods Crushing and Hauling), Amy Peterson, Luke Peterson our Outstanding Logger of the year, Vice President Sean and President Russ
Also honored during our meeting were Outstanding Inspector and Outstanding Logger of the Year for 2018. The award for Outstanding Inspector of the Year went to Steve Cuvala, Private Forestry Specialist for the Idaho Department of Lands in the St Joe Area. Steve has been a long-time supporter of our program as both a dedicated Inspector and a Tree Farmer in his own right as well. In addition, Steve has served many years as our Idaho State Committee Treasurer.       President Russ thanked Steve for his long service to our program and presented him with a plaque and embroidered rain parka.
Steve Cuvala, Idaho Outstanding Inspector of the Year 2018

 

Forestry Tour for Southern Idaho

Wednesday, May 16 beginning 8:30 AM

 

Whether you own 10 acres of forest land or 2000, the Forestry Tour for Southern Idaho will provide the tools and information you need to improve the health of your private forest. If you want to harvest commercial timber, limit outbreaks of insects and disease, or reduce fuels near your home, you’ll learn some of the different management practices to accomplish your goals.

The Idaho Department of Lands brings the Forestry Tour for Southern Idaho to Adams County on Wednesday, May 16th. We’ll kick things off at 8:30 a.m. with a coffee social at the fairgrounds exhibition building, hosted by the Idaho Tree Farm Program. Then you’ll learn about “Bugs and Crud” that can affect your forest land, and how to estimate timber volume in “Log Scaling 101,” presented by IDL forestry professionals.

We’ll tour Western Timber Company and learn about their specialty lumber products and view a sawmill demonstration at a local mill. In the afternoon, we’ll visit two different private properties to take a look at examples of before-and-after recommended management activities, including pre-commercial thinning, bark beetle control and fuel reduction treatments.

Throughout the day, you’ll have a chance to talk with foresters and other resource professionals, loggers, and your fellow timberland owners. We limit the number of participants so that everyone has ample time to ask questions and discuss best management practices.

Register now by contacting the Adams SWCD office at 208-253-4668, or email aswd@ctcweb.net. The cost of the tour is just $10 to cover materials.

Please bring your lunch and dress for whatever our mid-May weather may throw at us.

Loggers and foresters can earn Society of American Foresters continuing education credits for this workshop. For more information, contact John Lillehaug, Private Forestry Specialist with IDL, at 208-634-7125.

This Idaho Forest Stewardship Program tour is brought to you by Idaho Department of Lands, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Idaho Tree Farm Program, and the Adams Soil and Water Conservation District.

 

Idaho Tree Farm Committee Approves Fee System
As we discussed in the last newsletter our parent organization, the American Forest Foundation (AFF), has indicated they will be passing part of the cost of 3rd party forest certification on to the states. We will need to put together an economic plan to show AFF how we will cover this cost and the Idaho Tree Farm Committee voted at the April meeting to institute a fee system for our members. We created a subcommittee group to look into the specifics implementing this system and the exact cost for each Tree Farmer we would need to assess in order to keep our program fiscally sound. The subcommittee will be reporting back at our next quarterly meeting in July with a recommendation of how to proceed.       As we firm these details up we will be passing that information along to our members.

 

Upcoming U of I Extension Forestry Classes
Nearly everyone has seen dead trees dotting northern Idaho forests. Most of the trees you notice were killed by bark beetles, but many other insects and diseases kill trees, often in less visible ways.

On Friday, July 27th, the Forest Insect and Disease Field Day will give participants first-hand exposure to a wide range of organisms that impair the growth of trees and forests in northern Idaho, including: western pine beetle and other bark beetles; Armillaria and other root diseases; white pine blister rust; Indian paint fungus, pini rot and other stem decays; and dwarf mistletoes. Experts will help participants identify insect and disease symptoms and discuss practical long and short-term methods of dealing with them.

Forest Thinning & Pruning Field Day to be held in Bonners Ferry, June 2nd
Trees killed by bark beetle attacks always make forest owners ask: “what can we do about it?” Whether you have problems with insects or disease, concerns about fire, or just want to help forest growth, the response from foresters is nearly universal: thin your forest. This is especially true in northern Idaho, where forests frequently become overstocked. Thinning and pruning can favor better adapted tree species, improve tree quality, reduce fire risk, improve access, and enhance many other values.
Forestry Shortcourse offered in Sandpoint, Wednesday mornings, June-July, 2018
Many Idaho forest landowners desire a better understanding of how forests grow and how they can better manage their forest property to meet their goals. Furthermore, forest landowners are often required to demonstrate planned, active forest management to qualify for lower forestry property tax rates and cost-share assistance for management activities such as thinning.

This summer, a 6-session program, titled the Forestry Shortcourse, will help enrich forest landowners’ understanding of forest ecology, silviculture, forest health, wildlife habitat, and other forestry topics. In the process, participants are coached by natural resource professionals on how to develop a management plan for their forest.

———————————————————————————————————

For more information on specific sessions in the series, contact Chris Schnepf at (208) 446-1680
“Forest Insect & Disease Field Day” to be held July 27th in Sandpoint

 

Forest Health Updates, Idaho Department of Lands

Current Projects Statewide – Erica Eidson. Forest Health Specialist

EDRR funnel traps placed near waste or recycling facilities
Another important reminder for this time of year relates to pine engraver beetle management. Now that the weather is warming up, folks are eager to start on forest management projects. Freshly cut (or storm damaged) pine is highly attractive to Ips pine engravers this time of year, as they are just beginning their first flight period. Fresh pine logs and slash on the ground are likely to become infested, and after about 6 weeks, a second generation of beetles can emerge from the down material and move into adjacent standing pine. We are starting to get some calls about this and seeing a number of new pine slash piles cropping up. Here are a few slash management suggestions for this time of year that might be a good reminder to help folks avoid problems with pine engraver outbreaks: https://www.idl.idaho.gov/forestry/forest-health/2017-single-pest-fact-sheet-pine-engraver.pdf

 

Currently, we are hard at work putting out MCH, which is an anti-aggregation pheromone of Douglas-fir beetle. It comes in small pouches or ‘bubble caps’ that can be stapled to trees for 1 year of protection against Douglas-fir beetle. https://www.fs.fed.us/foresthealth/technology/pdfs/MCH_handbook_11_15_508.pdf Recently burned areas with scorched Douglas-fir and storm damaged areas with recent (still green) Douglas-fir or larch blowdown are particularly good candidates for MCH treatment (Douglas-fir beetle can successfully attack and reproduce in down but not standing western larch). We treated several areas near Kamiah and will be treating additional areas in SE Idaho. Now is the best time of year to put out MCH, because Douglas-fir beetles will be emerging and looking for new hosts to attack soon.
This year, Idaho is participating in Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) surveys https://foresthealth.fs.usda.gov/edrr to monitor for invasive wood borers of deciduous and coniferous hosts, as well as for exotic species of Ips bark beetles. We are in the process of placing funnel traps (see attached photos) at 12 sites across the state and will be monitoring them for 12 weeks. We have selected sites in close proximity to wood waste facilities (i.e., transfer stations and wood recycling facilities) or areas that store imported goods with wood packing materials, such as wooden pallets (i.e., shipping yards, granite slab vendors). The idea is that potentially infested wood material may end up at these types of locations, and the EDRR trapping program could help us detect any new infestations at early stages, before exotic insects become established in an area.

 

Events to Highlight

May 16, 2018 – Forestry Tour for Southern Idaho, Adams County, ID

June 2, 2018 – Forest Thinning and Pruning Field Day, Bonners Ferry, ID

July 19, 2018 – Idaho Tree Farm Committee Meeting, CDA, ID

July 27, 2018 – Forest Insect & Disease Field Day, Sandpoint, ID

Welcome New Members!

 

The Idaho Tree Farm Committee extends a special welcome to the 8 newest Idaho Tree Farm Program’s certified members.     Thank you to the District Chairs and Inspecting Foresters for promoting membership in the Idaho Tree Farm Program through the American Tree Farm System®.

As a current member, and a steward of the land, we appreciate your current support of the program and your management of the forestland for pride and pleasure. Thank you for your continued commitment to protecting watersheds and wildlife habitat, conserving soil and, at the same time, producing the wood America needs and uses.

 

Tree Farm Member Acreage County Inspecting Forester
Ben & Farrah Zumhoff 200 Clearwater Matthew Engberg
Jake & Karen Rajala 27 Latah Robert Barkley
Scott & Michelle Schlader 21 Nez Perce David Summers
Michael & Marcia Stayton 182 Latah Robert Barkley
Sam Duncan 20 Latah Robert Easley
Brandon & Rene Creed 20 Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Alan & Debbie Flory Tree Farm #2 10 Boundary Tim Kyllo
Roady Tree Farm 193 Boundary Russ Hegedus

 

 

Stay Informed…..

In case you are ever wondering what is going on at the committee level, our Minutes are now being posted on the Idaho Tree Farm Program website. Just log onto our website for Minutes of previous sessions, contact information, upcoming events, and other news of note to help you in your Tree Farm endeavors.

 

 

We’re on the Web!

Learn more at:

www.idahotreefarm.org

 

About Our Organization…

The purpose of the Idaho Tree Farm Program is to promote better forest management among nonindustrial forest owners. The vehicle for achieving this aim is the American Tree Farm System® (ATFS), sponsored nationally by the American Forest Foundation (AFF), state wide by the Idaho SFI State Implementation Committee (SFI SIC), and administered by the Idaho Tree Farm Committee (State Committee).

 

Congratulations Kroetch Family! 

Make plans to join us on the Fall Tour of their Tree Farms September 2018

 

 

Newsletter Winter 2018

Winter 2018
Idaho Tree Farm Program
P.O. Box 2659 • Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814 • (T) 208.667.4641, ext 503 • (F) 208.664.0557
www.idahotreefarm.org • admin@idahotreefarm.org
Idaho Tree Farm Program

2018 Annual Meeting

Family Forest Landowners and Managers Conference

March 25-27, 2018, Moscow, ID

 

With the days getting longer and spring starting to appear on the radar, that means one thing for sure – It’s time to pack your bag and make plans to attend the Family Forest Landowners and Managers Conference in Moscow! The 2018 conference will be held March 25-27 at the University Inn Best Western and the theme for this year is “Securing the Future of My Forest – Balancing the Risks & Rewards”. As in the past the annual meeting of our Idaho Tree Farm Program will be held Monday night (26th) at 6:30 PM and all are welcome.     There will be some appetizers and a no host bar, updates on last year’s accomplishments, a look at what’s in store for the upcoming season, and the crowning of our Idaho Outstanding Tree Farmer, Inspector, and Logger of the year.

The schedule for the conference this year will be a “Ties to the Land” session Sunday facilitated by Kirk and Madeline David followed by a “Get Acquainted” no-host social. Monday will cover various issues surrounding forests and fires, with a showing of the video “The Era of Megafires”. Topics will cover updates on the federal level regarding fire funding, the use of prescribed fire on private lands, and what to do to prepare for & work through the event when fire comes your way.     Tuesday morning the classes will center around “Making Management Pay”, with various breakout sessions in the afternoon on “Forest Critters and Forest Intruders”. There will definitely be something for everyone about caring for your Tree Farm – fires, funding, forest health improvements, and much more.

In addition to the Idaho Tree Farm Program annual meeting, there will also be a business meeting for the Inland Empire Society of American Foresters at 4:00 PM Monday, and the annual meeting of the Idaho Forest Owners Association at 7:00 AM Tuesday.

Plan to come for learning, socializing & networking with landowners, foresters and agency personnel from all facets of private timberland ownership.

 

2017-2018
Officers:
•   President –Russ Hegedus
Idaho Forest Group
(T) 208.255.3250•  Vice President –
Sean Hammond
(T) 208.610.8754•  Treasurer –
Steve Cuvala
Idaho Dept. of Lands
(T) 208.245.4551

•  Administrator –
Colleen Meek
ID Tree Farm Program

admin@idahotreefarm.org

(T) 208.667.4641

2017-2018
District Chairs:

District 1 Chair –
Andy Eckberg
Idaho Forest Group
aeckberg@idfg.com

(T) 208.255.3276

District 2 Chair –
Tim Schaffer
Bennett Lumber Products
(T) 208.819.1214

•  District 3 Chair –
John Lillehaug
All About Forestry
(T) 208.630.4076

 

 

 

 

Fee Structure to be Implemented for Idaho Tree Farm Program

 

What is being a Tree Farmer worth to you? Program costs continue to rise, and we have discussed the possibility of a fee system to cover these for some time now. Most likely this will be put in place for 2019. The Idaho Tree Farm Committee is currently considering an annual charge of $10.00 per Tree Farm and plans a final vote on this at the April 2018 committee meeting.

Tree Farming means many things to many landowners. Caring for a special timbered tract, creating a plan to reach your personal goals, access to new information as it comes along, socializing with other landowners, and being a part of the largest and oldest private land stewardship organization in America – these are all part of ATFS.

The thing that sets the Tree Farm program apart from others though is that it exists as a certification body. As a certified Tree Farm your land is recognized under the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) as meeting required standards for sustainability. As such, products from your land can be sold into various markets as sustainably certified, which is becoming increasingly important to manufacturers.       Many of you will remember the “State Voice, State Choice” discussion we had regarding whether to remain a certified program and our vote to go ahead with this in April 2015.

This certification hinges on regular 3rd party audit review of each state’s program. Up to this point our parent organization, American Forest Foundation (AFF), has borne the entire cost of the 3rd party review. Beginning in 2019 though, they have given notice a $10.00 charge for each Tree Farm will be assessed to the various state programs. As part of our decision to continue as a certified state program, we need to provide AFF with a financial plan by the end of 2018 as to how we will generate this assessment, hence the need now to begin a fee system.

Keep in mind, the charge from AFF to each state is by Tree Farm, not Tree Farmer. Those of you that own a single Tree Farm will be assessed a single $10.00 fee, but those with multiple tree farms will be assessed $10.00 for each Tree Farm number in our system.

If you have any questions or desire more information, we will go over this as well at our annual meeting during the Family Forest Landowners & Managers Conference in Moscow this coming March. You may also contact our State office at 208-667-4641 or admin@idahotreefarm.org

 

 

In our last newsletter we told you a little about the University of Idaho Nursery and Seedling Research committee and the role it plays in developing the best seedlings to meet our needs. Currently, Tree Farm is not represented on the research committee and we have formally requested a seat at the table. They are considering this request and have asked for some information as to what Tree Farm is all about, which we have provided them. We will keep you abreast of their decision and whatever information is available regarding seedling research and development news of importance to Tree Farmers.
U of I Center for Forest Nursery and Seedling Research

 

Project Learning Tree Update

 

Change and Stability: PLT Moves into Fifth Decade

The past year brought big changes for Project Learning Tree (PLT). In mid-2017, after many decades with the American Forest Foundation, PLT became a program of the Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc. (SFI). Integration into SFI provides PLT with opportunities to expand its reach and impact. In turn, PLT helps with SFI’s increasing focus on community engagement.

Idaho PLT continues to operate as in the past. Since 1993, PLT has served as the anchor environmental education program of the Idaho Forest Products Commission. IFPC is funded by mandatory assessments paid solely by the forest industry. Additional Idaho PLT funding partners include the Idaho Department of Lands, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, Idaho Firewise, Timber License Plate fund, Idaho Tree Farm Program, and a variety of competitive grants.

Each year, roughly 400 PreK-12th grade teachers and youth leaders participate in Idaho PLT professional development workshops. These educators can easily reach over 25,000 youth every year. IFPC also provides tree cookie kits and Idaho-specific and forestry related printed and digital resources that are classroom appropriate and readily augment PLT. Additional opportunities for this key audience include the Sustainable Forestry Tour for Teachers & Counselors, Forest Products Week Essay Contest, Arbor Day Student Photo Contest, Papermaking and Forester Tools lending kits, Forest Education Grants, social media and a comprehensive website, idahoforests.org.

Of particular interest to family forest owners are PLT’s Nature Activities for Families. Nearly forty activities are available FREE for download at https://www.plt.org/activities-for-families/. Explore PLT’s website to get acquainted with the many exciting things PLT is doing. The most recent additions to PLT’s extensive menu of teaching resources include innovative new E-Units. These units provide the hands-on, minds-on indoor and outdoor activities you expect from PLT, with the curriculum and resources accessible online. Teachers applaud the E-Units’ intuitive instructional design, and the ease with which they can meet academic standards.

As PLT moves into its fifth decade of teaching students how to think – not what to think – about the environment and their responsibility for it, PLT and SFI will work closely together to expand environmental and sustainability education in diverse ways. Idaho PLT looks forward to working with our local partners to achieve this in our beautiful Idaho back yard!

Learn more at www.idahoforests.org. Contact Idaho PLT at plt@idahoforests.org or you may call Michelle Youngquist at 208-334-4061

 

 

Upcoming U of I Extension Forestry Classes
Nearly everyone has seen dead trees dotting northern Idaho forests. Most of the trees you notice were killed by bark beetles, but many other insects and diseases kill trees, often in less visible ways.

On Friday, July 27th, the Forest Insect and Disease Field Day will give participants first-hand exposure to a wide range of organisms that impair the growth of trees and forests in northern Idaho, including: western pine beetle and other bark beetles; Armillaria and other root diseases; white pine blister rust; indian paint fungus, pini rot and other stem decays; and dwarf mistletoes. Experts will help participants identify insect and disease symptoms and discuss practical long and short term methods of dealing with them.

 

Forest Thinning & Pruning Field Day to be held in Bonners Ferry, June 2nd

 

Trees killed by bark beetle attacks always make forest owners ask: “what can we do about it?” Whether you have problems with insects or disease, concerns about fire, or just want to help forest growth, the response from foresters is nearly universal: thin your forest. This is especially true in northern Idaho, where forests frequently become overstocked. Thinning and pruning can favor better adapted tree species, improve tree quality, reduce fire risk, improve access, and enhance many other values.
Forestry Shortcourse offered in Sandpoint, Wednesday mornings, June-July, 2018

 

Many Idaho forest landowners desire a better understanding of how forests grow and how they can better manage their forest property to meet their goals. Furthermore, forest landowners are often required to demonstrate planned, active forest management to qualify for lower forestry property tax rates and cost-share assistance for management activities such as thinning.

This summer, a 6-session program, titled the Forestry Shortcourse, will help enrich forest landowners’ understanding of forest ecology, silviculture, forest health, wildlife habitat, and other forestry topics. In the process, participants are coached by natural resource professionals on how to develop a management plan for their forest.

———————————————————————————————————

For more information on specific sessions in the series, contact Chris Schnepf at (208) 446-1680

 

“Forest Insect & Disease Field Day” to be held July 27th in Sandpoint

 

Forest Health Updates, Idaho Department of Lands

Pine Slash and Bark Beetles – Tom Eckberg. Entomologist

In the middle of winter, we don’t often think about bark beetle problems, but when you have ponderosa or lodgepole pine, you need to consider the pine engraver, Ips pini. This is a very common bark beetle that has the potential to cause problems in the late spring and summer, but the problems often start in the winter. Due to access and logistical issues at sawmills, pine stands that are in lower elevations are often harvested in the winter or spring. During the cooler times of year, pine log decks do not have as many problems with staining due to the symbiotic blue stain fungi that bark beetles transmit. While this is a valid concern, untreated pine slash created in the winter and spring can cause unwanted mortality the following summer if precautions are not taken.

Pine engraver prefers to breed in fresh pine slash >3” in diameter, such as topwood and cull logs; branches are usually not a problem. When slash piles are created in the winter or spring, it will be green and is infested by overwintering beetles which emerge from the duff or from beneath bark of dead trees when temperatures reach about 60O F. Since this species has 2-3 generations per year, the next flight of beetles emerges about six weeks the piles are first attacked (usually June). If the beetles cannot find fresh slash, they will attack standing trees. Mortality usually occurs in dense stands of small diameter trees, often in close proximity to slash piles. During the last two years, we have seen three or a partial third generation in the Coeur d’Alene area where two generations is the norm.

If you create slash in the winter or spring, it’s almost a certainty that pine engraver will find it, so if pine harvest or management activity occurs during this time, you should take precautions to treat the slash. The idea is to make the slash unavailable or unattractive to the beetles, and can be accomplished by lopping it into smaller pieces and scattering it to aid drying. Using the slash as a mat for equipment will remove the bark and destroy the food source for the beetles. Removing as much topwood as possible, either as sawlogs or as pulp is an excellent option where markets allow. Burning pine slash as you go also removes the problem, if it can be done safely and where regulations allow.

Leaving small pine slash piles or log decks in a stand to be burned in the fall is a recipe for tree mortality. The piles will get infested, dry out and emerging beetles will attack nearby standing trees. If there are landing piles that won’t be burned, try to leave long butts, cull logs and topwood at the bottom and space the piles throughout the stand. These larger piles tend to stay green longer and beetles will reinfest the piles. This technique has been successful, but failures occur during droughts and hot summers.

The best advice is to NOT create slash during the winter and spring, but if this is unavoidable, take precautions to prevent unwanted “thinning” by the pine engraver.

 

Same site in July before slash pile is burnt and later in November after the pile was burned. Note the beetle activity throughout the understory.

 

Events to Highlight

March 25-27, 2018 – Family Forest Landowners & Managers Conference and Exposition, Moscow, ID

March 26, 2018 – Idaho Tree Farm Program Annual Meeting, Moscow, ID

April 19, 2018 – Idaho Tree Farm     Committee Meeting, CDA, ID

 

Welcome New Members!

 

The Idaho Tree Farm Committee extends a special welcome to the 26 newest Idaho Tree Farm Program’s certified members.     Thank you to the District Chairs and Inspecting Foresters for promoting membership in the Idaho Tree Farm Program through the American Tree Farm System®.

As a current member, and a steward of the land, we appreciate your current support of the program and your management of the forestland for pride and pleasure. Thank you for your continued commitment to protecting watersheds and wildlife habitat, conserving soil and, at the same time, producing the wood America needs and uses.

 

Tree Farm Member Acreage County Inspecting Forester
Joseph Gamon 19 Bonner Van Smith
Joan Spencer 374 Bonner Tim Kyllo
Leonard Wood – Ely Place Tree Farm 80 Bonner Tim Kyllo
Gary & Debra Little 156 Kootenai Tim Kyllo
SPG Tree Farm #2 160 Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Wuennecke Jachetta Road Tree Farm 12 Bonner Tim Kyllo
Wuennecke Dufort Road Tree Farm 30 Bonner Tim Kyllo
PRLC Frost Peak 2 300 Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Mary Strom Bernard 30 Bonner Tim Kyllo
Teresa Highsmith 11 Bonner Tim Kyllo
Steve Wood Colburn Tree Farm 157 Bonner Tim Kyllo
Steve Wood Center Valley Tree Farm 28 Bonner Tim Kyllo
Steve Wood Gold Creek Tree Farm 40 Bonner Tim Kyllo
Steve Wood Grouse Creek Tree Farm 10 Bonner Tim Kyllo
Steve Wood Grouse Ck Rd Tree Farm 40 Bonner Tim Kyllo
Thomas Mackey 42 Boundary Russ Hegedus
Richard Dombrowski 100 Kootenai Meghan McEldery
Banks Family Trust 72 Bonner Doug Bradetich
Janet Hume 130 Bonner Mike Wolcott
Jacob Soni 10 Bonner Doug Bradetich
Brian Hooker 25 Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Fernan Lake Tree Farm 10 Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Dennine Fatato 29 Kootenai Tim Kyllo
McFaddan Tree Farm 11 Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Patrick Santy 19 Kootenai Dennis Parent
Dale Hutchings 26 Ada Tim Kennedy

 

 

Stay Informed…..

In case you are ever wondering what is going on at the committee level, our Minutes are now being posted on the Idaho Tree Farm Program website. Just log onto our website for Minutes of previous sessions, contact information, upcoming events, and other news of note to help you in your Tree Farm endeavors.

 

 

We’re on the Web!

Learn more at:

www.idahotreefarm.org

 

About Our Organization…

The purpose of the Idaho Tree Farm Program is to promote better forest management among nonindustrial forest owners. The vehicle for achieving this aim is the American Tree Farm System® (ATFS), sponsored nationally by the American Forest Foundation (AFF), state wide by the Idaho SFI State Implementation Committee (SFI SIC), and administered by the Idaho Tree Farm Committee (State Committee).

 

We look forward to seeing you at our annual meeting in Moscow.

Think Spring!

 

 

 

 

 

Newsletter Spring 2017

Spring 2017 Idaho Tree Farm Program
P.O. Box 2659 • Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814 • (T) 208.667.4641, ext 503 • (F) 208.664.0557
www.idahotreefarm.org • admin@idahotreefarm.org

Idaho Tree Farm Program Annual Meeting
2017-2018
Officers:

• President – Russ Hegedus
Idaho Forest Group (T) 208.255.3250
• Vice President – Sean Hammond (T) 208.610.8754
• Treasurer – Steve Cuvala
Idaho Dept. of Lands (T) 208.245.4551
• Administrator – Savannah Miller
ID Tree Farm Program (T) 208.667.4641
2015-2016
District Chairs:

• District 1 Chair – Andy Eckberg Idaho Forest Group aeckberg@idfg.com (T) 208.255.3276
• District 2 Chair – Tim Schaffer Bennett Lumber Products
(T) 208.819.1214
• District 3 Chair – John Lillehaug
All About Forestry (T) 208.630.4076
Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year 2017
Wood Wizard Tree Farm,
Kurt & Sandy Koetter, Rathdrum, ID
The annual meeting of our ID Tree Farm Program was held March 27 during the Family Forest
Landowners Conference and Exposition in Moscow, ID. Both the conference and our meeting were very
well attended this year. Current Program President Russ Hegedus gave a rundown of 2016 activities
and those planned for the upcoming season.

The main portion of the meeting was the announcement of our recipients for Outstanding Idaho Tree
Farmer, Inspector and Logger of the Year. This year the award for Tree Farmer went to Kurt and
Sandy Koetter of Rathdrum. They began their journey just out of college by purchasing a wood lot
near Bonners Ferry. Later they found 13 acres near Rathdrum where Sandy was teaching. As the years
went by they continued to purchase adjacent parcels until finally reaching the current total of 113
acres in their Wood Wizard Tree Farm.

The Koetters have been active through the years in Idaho Forest Owners Association, Tree Farm,
Master Forest Steward Program, and the Idaho State Forestry Contest. Kurt served many years as the
advisor for the Post Falls High School team, and they opened their Tree Farm to many groups of
students as a place to learn about and appreciate forestry. One of their early pupils, Sean
Hammond, was enthused enough to make working in the woods his profession. Sean was able to pay back
a bit for his experiences with the Koetters as their Nominating forester for this well deserved
award!

ITFC President Russ Hegedus and Vice President Sean Hammond presenting the Koetter’s their plaque
for ID Outstanding Tree Farmer of the Year 2017

Page 2 of 8 Idaho Tree Farm Program 2017 Annual Meeting (continued
from page 1)
Kurt and Sandy have spent a great deal of “sweat equity” over the years in stand improvements such
as planting, road stabilization, precommercial thinning, and watershed restoration. They continue
to harvest a few loads each year to keep up with growth & mortality. Wildlife flourish on the
parcel and the view looking out over the prairie is definitely something to behold. You will all
get a chance to see it in person when we hold the Fall Tour on their Tree Farm this September, so
make plans to join us. Congratulations Kurt and Sandy!!
Also recognized at our awards program is the recipient for Idaho Outstanding Tree Farm Inspector of
the Year. Our Inspectors remain the backbone of all the state programs and we appreciate their
efforts greatly.

The Outstanding Inspector this year is Chris Gerhart, Private Forestry Specialist for the ID Dept
of Lands in the Clearwater Area.

Chris has been active with both the Forest Stewardship and Tree Farm programs for a number of
years. During our recent certification audit, he was very helpful in making sure all the Tree
Farmers selected for review in his area were well prepared and free of any issues. His efforts
were a big part of the reason our field audits went so well. His nominating Forester, Russ Hegedus,
says “Chris has a heart for landowners and doing the right thing for them”.

Well said, and a big “Thank You” to Chris from all of us for his hard work and dedication!

Chris Gerhart –
ID Outstanding Inspector of the Year
ITFC Past Chair Doug Bradetich (l) with John Kinne of Odenwald Forestry (r) presenting the
Outstanding Logger of the Year award.
As every landowner knows, a good logger is critical to doing a good job. For the last 25 years John
Kinne of Odenwald Forestry in Kootenai, ID has been doing above and beyond simply “good”. His work
on private tracts both small and large is great by any standards
& we are proud to name him Outstanding Logger of the Year. The true test of any contractor is
whether he is asked back for a return visit. John has an impressive string of family forest owners
that regularly seek him back for continued care of their parcels. In addition to his high level of
harvesting, John is also a Tree Farm Inspector and served a term as our District 1 Chair. He is
truly an ambassador for our program and an asset to stewardship in this area.
When it came time for the nominating Forester, Doug Bradetich, to log his own place he simply said
“My first choice was John”.

Page 3 of 8 Idaho Tree Farm Program
Forest Health Issues – What a Difference a Year Makes…
Tom Eckberg, Idaho Dept of Lands Entomologist

The last several years have been drier than average and forest insects, especially bark beetles,
are able to take advantage of drought stressed trees. Pine engraver (Ips pini) is especially adept
at causing mortality in dense, overstocked stands of lodgepole and ponderosa pines; and fir
engraver (Scolytus ventralis) kills grand fir of all sizes during droughts. Idaho Department of
Lands (IDL) Forest Health personnel responded to 20 bark beetle/drought requests for assistance
coming in from January-April 2016, mostly for pine engraver and fir engraver compared to five this
year. Drought puts trees into stress and lowers their ability to defend against bark beetles. Pitch
is the tree’s defense, and water is necessary to make pitch and move it to the beetle galleries to
try and push them out. When sufficient water is not available, especially when trees are growing on
marginal sites or in overstocked stands, bark beetle mortality is very common. So far in 2017, the
Coeur d’Alene area has five inches (50%) more precipitation than normal. This is very good news for
trees, not so good for bark beetles. As we know, weather can change and pretty soon northern Idaho
will be experiencing our normal dry summers. This means that we still have to follow best
management practices for bark beetles. Proper density management of stands is the best prevention
strategy. Also remember that the best time to harvest or thin pines is during the
mid-July to November time frame. Creating pine slash so it is available to pine engraver in the
spring is inviting trouble. Even though the threat is diminished when there is ample moisture,
mortality in nearby stands is still possible. Slash that is generated in the winter or spring
should be treated by burning (when safe), chipping or masticating, dozed trampling or large piles.
Consult US Forest Service or IDL management publications for more information on pine engraver
management.

NOTE: If you desire more information on bark beetles, Extension Forestry is offering a field day
on June 30 in Coeur d’Alene. See the Extension Forestry calendar article on the next page.

Page 4 of 8 Idaho Tree Farm Program Forestry for Southern Idaho –
Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Lucky Peak Nursery – 15169 East Highway 21, Boise, ID
We began partnering in a forest field day specifically targeted at the southern end of our state a
few years ago and it has become very popular with many of our members. This year the tour will be
in the Boise area beginning at Lucky Peak Nursery. It will start with a coffee social hosted by our
ID Tree Farm Program. Topics for discussion will include Forest Practices updates, the EQIP
program, and current forest health issues.

The group will tour Lucky Peak Nursery then board a bus for several stops on the Walker and
Baumhoff family properties. Items to view will include sediment control structures, tree planting,
results of a thinning and subsequent harvest in one of the Baumhoff stands, and rehabilitation
after the Pioneer Fire of 2016.

Here is an excerpt from the informational flyer:
“Whether you have 5 acres or 2,000 acres, this tour will give you a look at different management
practices implemented by family forest landowners. This program will allow participants to interact
with landowners, loggers and natural resource professionals through discussion focusing on managing
forest lands and applying various stewardship practices at each stop. The program will be
instructed by John Lillehaug & Tim Kennedy, Idaho Department of Lands Private Forestry Specialists,
Tom Eckberg, IDL Forest Health Specialist, and Forest Landowners/managers at each respective stop.”

USFS Lucky Peak Tree Nursery, Boise, ID Wednesday, May 17, 2015 (8:30 am to 5:00 pm) Meet at Lucky
Peak Tree Nursery15169 E Hwy 21 Boise, Idaho 83716
22 miles South of Idaho City on Hwy
12 miles north from I-84 Gowan Road on Hwy 21
. – Bus will be provided for tour

Please bring a sack lunch and dress for field and weather conditions.

For program questions contact Tim Kennedy at 208-334-3488 or email tkennedy@idl.idaho.gov

Upcoming Events on the Extension Forestry Calendar
The University of Idaho Extension Forestry Program does a wonderful job providing classes and
training for landowners. Here are some upcoming events for May & June:
Natural Resource Planning for Rural Landowners:
Creating Your Own Forest Plan– May 11 and 18, 2017 in Orofino Firewise Principles and Practices –
May 18, 2017 in Moscow Bark Beetle Field Day – July 30, 2017 in Coeur d’Alene
For a complete list of events log onto http://www.uidaho.edu/extension/forestry or contact:

Chris Schnepf (208)-446-1680 Bill Warren (208-476-4434)
Randy Brooks (208)-885-7718
(Coeur d’Alene) (Orofino)
(Moscow)

Page 5 of 8 Idaho Tree Farm Program
Idaho Tree Farm Program – Member Outreach Efforts
Over the past year, we have worked to increase outreach to our Idaho Tree Farmers. One of the
simplest ways to do this is to ensure Tree Farmers are being visited and inspected every 6 years.
We know that some of you are past due for this and our committee is working to bring the
inspections more current. To help facilitate it we have begun sending out postcards to individuals
currently listed in the program but showing as due for a field visit. Some of you may have
received one of these in the mail already. The postcards are being sent out in groups starting with
the members most overdue for inspection and working towards those most current.

The postcards ask three simple questions: Do you wish to be in the Tree Farm Program? Would you
like to schedule a field visit from an Inspector?, and Do you have a management plan to the current
standards?.

This will allow us to stay in contact with active members and help keep our database up to date,
which will also aid in subsequent program audits by our national office. If you happen to receive
one of these, please take a moment to fill it out and return it to our State Administrator for
action.

We have also worked to partner in more field tours, workshops and socials in order to better serve
our members and keep you engaged. If you have any other ideas regarding outreach efforts, please
let us know!

Idaho Forest Owners Association / Forest Seedling Program
2017 proved to be a banner year for delivery of forest seedlings to the four Northern Soil and
Water Conservation Districts. A total 193,000 seedlings were distributed this April.

All the seedlings are currently grown out in 8 or 15 cubic inch plugs, discontinuing the use of 5
cubic inch plugs. The larger are proving to be more vigorous.

This is the fourth year the IFOA/FSP has been distributing seedlings since assuming management from
the RC&D Program. Their first delivery was around 80,000 seedlings to the current delivery of
193,000 and continues to grow! The Program has a target of 236,000 seedlings for the 2018 grow-out

NOTE: Please order NOW for your 20018 and/or 2019 seedling delivery. These orders are processed on
a first come/first serve basis. Please contact your Soil & Water Conservation District for order
placement.

Benewah SWCD – 208-686-1699, ext 109 or email leann.daman@id.usda.net Bonner SWCD – 208-263-5310,
ext 100 or email amanda.abajian@id.nacdnet.net Boundary SCD – 208-267-3340, ext 107 or email
cassie.olson@id.nacdnet.net Kootenai-Shoshone SWCD – 208-762-4939, ext 101 or email
ksswcd@yahoo.com
Wood Family advances to Regional Level
The national ATFS office recently announced our 2016 ID Outstanding Tree Farmers of the year, the
Wood Family Tree Farms, are one of the finalists for the Regional Outstanding Tree Farmer of the
Year award. This is exciting news for them and our state as well. We wish them the best as the
process goes along. As those who attended the Fall Tour last year can attest, they are very
deserving of this honor.

Page 6 of 8 Idaho Tree Farm Program

Idaho Forestry Day at the Legislature

Shortly after the opening of each legislative session, particular days are set aside to highlight
the various sectors of business throughout the state. Our Idaho Tree Farm Program routinely takes
part in the day set aside to showcase forestry issues to our lawmakers. It is a great way to
reinforce what we do to the returning senators and representatives, as well as introduce our issues
to those new to the offices. This year Forestry Day at the Legislature luncheon was held January
31st in Boise, and was hosted by Society of American Foresters, Idaho Chapters. The featured
speaker was University of Idaho wood technology professor Dr. Tom Gorman, Ph.D., P.E., who
presented on innovations in wood products, and the potential for cross-laminated timber. The
luncheon was very well attended by legislators and members from forestry and paper product
industries.
ITFC’s John Lillehaug, Tim Kennedy and Savannah Miller attended and hosted a display at the event.
Next year’s FDAL Luncheon is scheduled for January 24th, 2018 in Boise.

Thanks Tim, Savannah and John for staffing again this year! (l-r) Inspector Tim
Kennedy, State Administrator
Savannah Miller, and District 3 Chair John Lillehaug at the Idaho Tree Farm Booth
Idaho State Forestry Contest – May 11, 2017 – ( 35th Anniversary!!)
Delay Family Tree Farm, Careywood, ID
One of the most anticipated events each spring is the Idaho State Forestry Contest. Each year since
1983 students, coaches and volunteers from all over the state gather at the Delay Family Tree Farm
in Careywood, ID as teams compete in 10 areas of forest management: 1) log scaling, 2) timber
cruising, 3) tree identification and tree planting, 4) map reading, 5) compass and pacing, 6) tool
identification, 7) soils and water quality, 8) tree health, 9) silviculture and 10) noxious weeds.

The contest has grown tremendously over the last 35 years and currently several hundred students
from 2nd grade through high school compete in Novice, Rookie, Junior and Senior divisions. The day
ends with a BBQ lunch and awards ceremony. This year appears to be on course to break all
attendance records. The staff indicates they are planning to feed as many as 900 people at the
lunch!

As you would think this much participation calls for a great deal of planning and volunteer help.
It is a very enjoyable day out in the fresh air with a bunch of eager students. Anyone wishing to
help out – whether you are an old hand in the woods or just getting started – can most likely be
put to good use.

For more info call Karen Robinson at ID Dept of Lands, Sandpoint ph 263-5104 or
krobinson@idl.idaho.gov

Page 7 of 8 Idaho Tree Farm Program

Events to Highlight

May 11, 2017 – Idaho State Forestry Contest, Delay Farms, Careywood, ID

July 20, 2016 – Idaho Tree Farm Committee Meeting, CDA, ID

Sept 9, 2017 – Idaho Tree Farm Program Fall Tour, Wizard Tree Farm, Rathdrum, ID
Stay Informed…..
In case you are ever wondering what is going on at the committee level, our Minutes are now being
posted on the Idaho Tree Farm Program website. Just log onto our website for Minutes of previous
sessions, contact information, upcoming events, and other news of note to help you in your Tree
Farm endeavors.
We’re on the Web!
Learn more at:
www.idahotreefarm.org

About Our Organization…
The purpose of the Idaho Tree Farm Program is to promote better forest management among
nonindustrial forest owners. The vehicle for achieving this aim is the American Tree Farm System®
(ATFS), sponsored nationally by the American Forest Foundation (AFF), state wide by the Idaho SFI
State Implementation Committee (SFI SIC), and administered by the Idaho Tree Farm Committee (State
Committee).

Welcome New Members!
The Idaho Tree Farm Committee extends a special welcome to the 36 newest Idaho Tree Farm Program’s
certified members. Thank you to the District Chairs and Inspecting Foresters for promotin
membership in the Idaho Tree Farm Program through the American Tree Farm System®.

As a current member, and a steward of the land, we appreciate your current support of the program
and your management of the forestland for pride and pleasure. Thank you for your continued
commitment to protecting watersheds and wildlife habitat, conserving soil and, at the same time,
producing the wood America needs and uses.

Tree Farm Member Acreage County Inspecting
Forester
Stanch Tree Farm 55 Kootenai Tim
Kyllo
Wurster Tree Farm 10 Kootenai Tim
Kyllo
Dunn Trust Tree Farm 42 Kootenai Tim
Kyllo
Maryann Denning 27 Bonner Tim
Kyllo
Charles Gordon 19 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
John Mott 350 Kootenai
Dennis Parent
Carl Dunn 18 Kootenai
Tim Kyllo
Henning and Patricia Otto 19 Bonner Tim Kyllo Fitzpatrick
Lakeview Powerline 1 22 Bonner Tim Kyllo Fitzpatrick Lakeview
Powerline 2 72 Bonner Tim Kyllo Fitzpatrick Lakeview Powerline 3
12 Bonner Tim Kyllo John Montandon
285 Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Dale Lunderse 1110 Nez Perce
Clark Christiansen
Josh Spencer 22 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Passer Living Trust 29 Kootenai
Tim Kyllo
Jaime and Susan Gordan 40 Bonner Tim
Kyllo
Ahren and Lori Spilker 18 Boundary Tim
Kyllo
Michael and Jacinta Rutledge 16 Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Cynthia Foot-Struble 10 Bonner Tim
Kyllo
Tom and Charlene Polek 22 Latah
Robert Barkley
Gary Van Stone 141 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Van Stone Oden Tree Farm 18 Bonner Tim Kyllo Gary
Van Stone Meryle Tree Farm 21 Bonner Tim Kyllo Dale Van Stone
13 Bonner Tim Kyllo Gary Van Stone
Brown Tree Farm 141 Bonner Tim Kyllo
Linden Timberlands, LLC 35 Latah
Robert Barkley
Larry Williams 40 Boundary
Andy Eckberg
Anna Marie Fels 21 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Mickey Leiding 10 Kootenai
Erin Bradetich
Mike Fritzsche 48 Bonner
Russ Hegedus
Leland Spindler 72 Bonner
Tim Kyllo

Page 8 of 8 Idaho Tree Farm Program
Welcome New Members (Continued from Page 6)
Tree Farm Member Acreage County Inspecting
Forester
Glen Rolofson 80 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Christian Fultz 20 Bonner
Doug Bradetich
Jory Gulman 14 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Paul Tallman 74 Bonner
Russ Hegedus
Doug and Lisa Gadwa 40 Latah
Robbie Easley

Congratulations once again to Kurt and Sandy Koetter 2017 Idaho Outstanding Tree Farmers of the
Year!

Make Plans to attend the Fall Tour on September 9th

Newsletter Spring 2016

Spring 2016 Idaho Tree Farm Program
204 E. Sherman Ave. • Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814 • (T) 208.667.4641 • (F) 208.664.0557
www.idahotreefarm.org • admin@idahotreefarm.org

Idaho Tree Farm Program Annual Meeting
2015-2016
Officers:

• Chair – Steve Funk
Edge Creek Tree Farm (T) 208.661.0644

• Vice Chair – Russ Hegedus
Idaho Forest Group (T) 208.255.3250

• Treasurer – Steve Cuvala
Idaho Dept. of Lands (T) 208.245.4551
• Administrator – Savannah Miller
ID Tree Farm Program (T) 208.667.4641
2015-2016
District Chairs:

• District 1 Chair – Andy Eckberg Idaho Forest Group aeckberg@idfg.com (T) 208.255.3276
• District 2 Chair – Tim Schaffer Bennett Lumber Products
(T) 208.819.1214
• District 3 Chair – John Lillehaug
All About Forestry (T) 208.630.4076
Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year 2016
The Wood Family of Sandpoint, ID
The annual meeting of our Idaho Tree Farm Program was held the first night of the 2016 Family
Forest Landowners & Managers Conference & Exposition on March 28 in Moscow. We have had a very good
turnout for the event the past several years and this one was no exception. Committee Chair Steve
Funk gave a recap of the happenings from 2015, most notably the audit review of our certified Tree
Farm Program. Only a very few items of improvement were noted by the auditors and our Idaho
management plans were praised as some of the best they had seen nationwide. A big “thank you” to
all the Inspectors and Tree Farmers that took part in this time consuming but worthwhile process.

The high point of our annual meeting is the presentation of awards for our Outstanding Idaho Tree
Farmer, Inspector, and Logger of the Year. This year we are very pleased to announce the Wood
Family of Sandpoint as our Idaho Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year! Jim and Virginia Wood, their
five children, and an ever growing extended family are long established members of the northern
Idaho area. Virginia’s family first homesteaded in the Gold Creek area northeast of Sandpoint just
prior to 1920, with Jim’s folks making their way there around 1940. Much of the country was cut
over and bleak in those days, but a lifetime of care and good stewardship has made it a beautiful
place to work & live today. As the family grew, they have continually added to their land base in
an effort to keep everyone together and engaged. Operations today include not only timberland, but
also cattle ranching, agriculture, commercial meat processing, road construction, a guest ranch,
and a community grade school. Wildlife is abundant throughout their ownership and care is taken to
protect the riparian areas. One item that greatly impressed the nomination committee

The Wood Family accepting their award for 2016 Idaho Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year

Page 2 of 7 Idaho Tree Farm Program 2016 Annual Meeting (continued
from page 1)
was the family’s involvement in the Forest Legacy Program. As a testament to their dedication of
keeping the land intact for future generations, in 2009 they placed 640 acres of timberland in the
Forest Legacy Program to be forever managed as a working forest. What a wonderful gift to give to
those generations to come! Congratulations to the entire family and we look forward to having a
great turnout this coming September at our Fall Tour on the Wood Family Tree Farms.
Also recognized at our awards program is the recipient for Idaho Outstanding Tree Farm Inspector of
the Year. Our Inspecting Foresters are a very crucial part of the Tree Farm Program and the award
this year went to Robert Barkley. Robert is with the Idaho Department of Lands, working out of the
Ponderosa Area Office. For the past 15 years he has been not only one of our most diligent and hard
working Inspectors, but also served continuously during that period as our District 2 Chair. During
our recent program audit he took the lead in working with the various Tree Farmers and other
Inspectors to ensure the southern half of our audit sites were properly prepared and ready for
inspection. He has been a familiar site for many years at countless field tours, clinics, landowner
conferences and other outreach activities. Though he has taken a very well deserved break and
stepped down as our District 2 Chair, he has pledged to remain an active part of our Idaho Tree
Farm Program. Thanks for all you have done and continue
to do for Tree Farming, Robert!
Luke (L) and Gary (R) Finney –
Idaho Outstanding Tree Farm Loggers of the Year
Robert Barkley –
Idaho Outstanding Tree Farm Inspector of the Year
When it comes down to boots in the dirt, a logging job is only as good as the logger on the site.
Our recipient for Idaho Outstanding Tree Farm Logger of the Year went to Gary and Luke Finney of
Harrison. The Finney family has been involved in logging for many years and is well known for the
fine job they do working with private landowners. During the field inspections the nomination
committee was very impressed with both their utilization of harvested material as well as the care
they give to the residual stand. Road work, culverts, water barring and slash management are all
well above par. To them, doing that little bit extra is just part of doing the job right and we
greatly appreciate their efforts. It has been said the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree and in
this case it applies very well. Luke’s father, the late Jack Finney, and Gary’s brother Paul
Finney, were also recognized as our Idaho Outstanding Tree Farm Logger of the Year some years back.
Nice job keeping the legacy going guys!

Page 3 of 7 Idaho Tree Farm Program
Forest Health Issues – Drought, Winter Storms, El Niño and Bark Beetles
Tom Eckberg, Idaho Dept of Lands Entomologist

The 2015 drought and warm El Niño weather made things difficult for trees in Idaho, and we are
seeing some of the effects now. Bark beetles often attack trees that are experiencing stress, and a
moisture deficit through the growing season stressed many trees last year. Ponderosa and lodgepole
pine mortality began to be observed in November, especially on drier exposures. Western pine beetle
and pine engraver were often found infesting the same stands. Damage was often worse in overstocked
stands. Some trees that were attacked last year are just now starting to fade to yellow and red.
Many small diameter grand fir and Douglas-fir trees have been turning red since at least November
in northern Idaho. Many have been growing on thin, rocky soils where the effects of the drought are
even more pronounced. Some trees may have been killed by the drought alone, but bark beetles are
also taking advantage of the stress. Fir engraver (Scolytus ventralis) is commonly found on grand
fir growing on drier sites. Secondary bark beetles have been found on small diameter Douglas-fir,
and in the branches of larger trees. In Douglas-fir, these secondary bark beetles (some with no
common names) cannot compete with Douglas-fir beetle, so they attack smaller trees, or in the tops
or branches of larger trees.
We expect the infested acres of fir engraver, western pine beetle and pine engraver to increase
during the 2016 Aerial Detection Survey due to the effects of the drought.
Wind and winter damage was severe in many parts of Idaho in 2015. High winds downed many trees in
November, and heavy snow loads toppled trees in December and later. Two bark beetles are of
particular concern when green, damaged pines or Douglas-fir are present in the spring; pine
engraver (Ips pini) and Douglas-fir beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae). Pine engraver is already
infesting green slash in the Coeur d’Alene area.
Pine engraver eggs being laid now will develop into adults that emerge in June or July to attack
standing trees. Douglas-fir beetle will be flying soon to attack down Douglas-fir, but new adults
will not emerge from these trees until this time next year. There is still time to salvage the
damaged pine before the new adults emerge in the summer. Infested Douglas-fir is not as time
sensitive, so it can be removed before the snow flies. On both pines and Douglas-fir, look on the
bark for piles of boring dust or frass to confirm if the tree is infested. Adult galleries will be
seen under the bark.

Grand fir poles killed by fir engraver near Harrison, March 30, 2016 (L). Small diameter GF killed
by fir engraver near Santa, November 17, 2015 (R).

Page 4 of 7 Idaho Tree Farm Program 2016 Forest Owners Field Day
Saturday, June 25th – Orofino, ID
The Forest Owners Field Day is a fun and informative opportunity for you to get together with other
family forest owners and improve your forestry knowledge and skill set. Experts from all across
the forestry spectrum will be leading workshops on items including forest insects & diseases,
logging safety, wildlife habitat, thinning & pruning your stand, reforestation, marketing your
logs, and much more. Regardless of whether you own a small tract or large, or whether you are a
greenhorn or an old hand, there is something of interest for everyone. The event is open to your
entire family; both young & old are welcomed. Pre-registration by June 17th is $20 per person or
$30 for a family of 2 or more. Registration at the gate is $30 per person or $40 for a family of 2
or more.
Event Timing – Gates will open at 8:00 AM, Presentations will be held through the morning at 9:00,
10:00, and 11:00 AM; and in the afternoon at 1:30, 2:30, and 3:30 PM.
Lunch – A catered lunch will be available for $10 with a deli sandwich, chips, cookie, and soda or
water (must be ordered no later than June 17), or feel free to bring your own picnic lunch.
Site Logistics – Walking short distances over nearly-level forested terrain is required. Portable
restrooms, drinking water, coffee, and refreshments are available on-site. Some seating is provided
at the stations and lunch area, but bring a camp chair if you have one. On-site non-hookup RV or
tent camping is available. For permission call (208) 476-7364. Be sure to dress for the weather and
wear sturdy footwear.
Directions – From the Orofino Bridge (Milepost 44 on Idaho 12), proceed East across bridge, turn
left onto Hwy 7, proceed North on Hwy 7 for ~0.1 miles, and turn right onto the Dent Bridge Road.
After 1.1 miles pass by the Lake View Road on your left. After 4.6 miles stay left, avoiding the
Wells Bench Road. After 4.9 miles stay right avoiding the Twin Ridge Road. At mile marker 11.1,
turn left onto Loseth Road, travel ~1.3 miles and turn left through green gate w/Tree Farm sign. Go
~.5 miles south to parking area. Follow the Forest Owner Field Day signs!
Registration – Register by June 17, 2016 to: Idaho Forest Owners Association, P.O. Box 1257, Coeur
d’Alene, ID 83816-1257. For questions or more info email to info@idahoforestowners.org or phone
(208)-262-1371.
Upcoming Events on the Extension Forestry Calendar
The University of Idaho Extension Forestry Program does a wonderful job providing classes and
training for landowners. Here are just a few of the upcoming events they are offering:
Pruning to Restore White Pine – June17, 2016 in Sandpoint Thinning & Pruning Field Day – June 18,
2016 in Plummer Forest Shrubs Field Day – July 8, 2016 in Coeur d’Alene
Forest Insects & Disease Field Day – July 15, 2016 in Bonners Ferry

For a complete list of events log onto http://www.uidaho.edu/extension/forestry or contact:

Chris Schnepf (208)-446-1680 Bill Warren (208-476-4434)
Randy Brooks (208)-885-7718 (Coeur d’Alene)
(Orofino) (Moscow)

Page 5 of 7 Idaho Tree Farm Program Idaho Tree Farm Program – Member
Outreach Efforts
When we voted last year to remain as a Certified Tree Farm Program, a couple requirements given us
by the National ATFS office were to ensure all members are reinspected within the 6 year standard
and that our database is current & correct. In order to help facilitate this we will be sending
out a post card sized mailer very soon asking some basic information about you and your Tree Farm.
We will eventually contact all our members, but will begin with the most long standing Tree Farmers
that show in our database as not having been reinspected in excess of 6 years.
When you receive your mailer there will be just a few basic questions. First, do you wish to remain
in the American Tree Farm system? If so, do you have a management plan? If you have a plan, is it
up to the current 2016-2020 Standards? Do you want to have an Inspector contact you?
Pretty simple and painless, but it will be a big help to us in cleaning up the database. The
return portion of the card will already have postage on it, so all you need to do is check the
appropriate boxes and pop it back in the mail to us. We all know that as the years go by parcels
are sold or added, family members pass away, and contact information sometimes changes. Ultimately,
we want to be sure we are properly serving you as Tree Farmers and that no one slips through the
cracks. Be watching for your card and please take a few moments to help us stay current and in
compliance with the requirements of our certification program. Thanks and we will be in touch!

Project Learning Tree Update
Project Learning Tree (PLT) is an award-winning environmental education program designed for
teachers and other educators, parents, and community leaders working with youth from preschool
through grade 12. Like the American Tree Farm System, PLT is also a program of the American Forest
Foundation that uses the forest as a window on the world, engaging the next generation of America’s
thought-leaders and decision makers.

Here are some of the upcoming PLT Professional Development Workshop Classes in Idaho:

Walk in the Forest – June 9/10 – Idaho City (camping available but not required) Focus on
Literature with WILD, WET and PLT – June 14/15 – Boise
Wildfires & Weeds – June 28/29 – Moscow
Focus on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) – July 21/22 – Lewiston or Cd’A Wildfires &
Weeds – July 25/26 – Boise
Focus on Literature with WILD, WET and PLT – August 3/4 – Post Falls Project Learning Tree –
October 21/22 – Boise

More classes are to be scheduled, check the website for the latest information.
Visit www.idahoforests.org/plt1.htm or call 208-334-4061
New Chairman for District 2
We are pleased to welcome Tim Schaffer as our new Chairman for District 2. Tim is with Bennett
Lumber Products in Princeton and will make a great addition to our Idaho Tree Farm Program. His
contact information is listed on the cover sheet if any of you wish to touch base or help welcome
him aboard.

Page 6 of 7 Idaho Tree Farm Program

Events to Highlight

May 12, 2016 – Idaho State Forestry Contest, Delay Farms, Careywood, ID

June 25, 2016 – Forest Owners Field Day, Orofino, ID

July 21, 2016 – Idaho Tree Farm Committee Meeting, CDA, ID

Sept 10, 2016 – Idaho Tree Farm Program Fall Tour, Wood Family Tree Farm, Sandpoint, ID
Stay Informed…..
In case you are ever wondering what is going on at the committee level, our Minutes are now being
posted on the Idaho Tree Farm Program website. Just log onto our website for Minutes of previous
sessions, contact information, upcoming events, and other news of note to help you in your Tree
Farm endeavors.
We’re on the Web!
Learn more at:
www.idahotreefarm.org

About Our Organization…
The purpose of the Idaho Tree Farm Program is to promote better forest management among
nonindustrial forest owners. The vehicle for achieving this aim is the American Tree Farm System®
(ATFS), sponsored nationally by the American Forest Foundation (AFF), state wide by the Idaho SFI
State Implementation Committee (SFI SIC), and administered by the Idaho Tree Farm Committee (State
Committee).

Welcome New Members!
The Idaho Tree Farm Committee extends a special welcome to the 61 newest Idaho Tree Farm Program’s
certified members. Thank you to the District Chairs and Inspecting Foresters for promoting
membership in the Idaho Tree Farm Program through the American Tree Farm System®.

As a current member, and a steward of the land, we appreciate your current support of the program
and your management of the forestland for pride and pleasure. Thank you for your continued
commitment to protecting watersheds and wildlife habitat, conserving soil and, at the same time,
producing the wood America needs and uses.

Tree Farm Member Acreage County
Inspecting Forester
Matthew Henningsen 960 Teton
Matthew Engberg
John Knous 40
Kootenai Diane Partridge
Dennis Mayer 19
Clearwater Chris Gerhart
Nick Albers 216
Clearwater Chris Gerhart
Rich Monteith 183
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Bear Tree Farm 64
Kootenai Gary Hess
Xann-Shapella Smith 30 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Mike Westhoff 37
Idaho Clark Christiansen
JeAnn Willson 93
Nez Perce Clark Christiansen
Jere Watson 384
Lewis Clark Christiansen
Oxbow Ranch LLC 2712 Idaho
Clark Christiansen
Mike Johnson 16
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Tim Brown 35
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Mike Sowders 21
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Brian Daniels 15
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Richard Brown 19
Bonner Russ Hegedus
William McCann Jr 2020 Lewis
Clark Christiansen
Neil Wimberley 27
Bonner Tim Kyllo
David Schunke 75
Valley John Lillehaug
IFG Timber Runge #1 Tree Farm 433 Kootenai
Tim Kyllo
Keith Olson 170
Latah Gary Hess
Eric Braunstein 10
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Clint Gray 30
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Spencer Hutchings 52
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Matthew Anthony 12
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Richard Rago 60
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Freda Campbell 19
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Pamela Hodaka 40
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Jake Hansen 13
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Pat Mason 73
Latah Gary Hess
Susan Degro 19
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Chris Courser 43
Bonner Tim Kyllo
IFG Timber Chilco Tree Farm 86 Kootenai
Tim Kyllo
IFG Timber Runge #2 Tree Farm 43 Kootenai
Tim Kyllo
Tom Martin 32
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Lloyd Wallace 19
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Larry Boyer / Boyer Ranch 840 Clearwater
Clark Christiansen
Bethany Ranch Home 67 Boundary
Tim Kyllo
Edward Tubbs 19
Kootenai Tim Kyllo

Page 7 of 7 Idaho Tree Farm Program
Welcome New Members (Continued from Page 6)
Tree Farm Member Acreage County
Inspecting Forester
Julie Ernest 94
Bonner Van Smith
Oxley Deep Creek, Inc 40
Boundary Tim Kyllo
Robert Reineke 28
Clearwater Chris Gerhart
Archie George 60
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Robert Tanner 40
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Roman Poplawski 19
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Patricia Hart 75
Boundary Tim Kyllo
James Jacobsen 38
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Russell Keyser 15
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Maryann Boseth 21
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Gene Soper 10
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
James and Elvina Doyle Family Trust 10 Kootenai
Tim Kyllo
Robert Young 10
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Phillip Henry 10
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Sean Rogers 10
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Mitch Belzak 30
Kootenai Tim Kyllo Carothers Mirror Lake Campground Tree Farm 10
Bonner Tim Kyllo Ted Leach
137 Clearwater Chris Gerhart
James Sharman TF3538 10 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
James Sharman TF3539 10 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
James Sharman TF3540 20 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
James Sharman TF3541 37 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Congratulations once again to our
2016 Idaho Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year! Make Plans to attend the Fall Tour on September
10th