Newsletter Spring 2017

Spring 2017 Idaho Tree Farm Program
P.O. Box 2659 • Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814 • (T) 208.667.4641, ext 503 • (F) 208.664.0557
www.idahotreefarm.org • admin@idahotreefarm.org

Idaho Tree Farm Program Annual Meeting
2017-2018
Officers:

• President – Russ Hegedus
Idaho Forest Group (T) 208.255.3250
• Vice President – Sean Hammond (T) 208.610.8754
• Treasurer – Steve Cuvala
Idaho Dept. of Lands (T) 208.245.4551
• Administrator – Savannah Miller
ID Tree Farm Program (T) 208.667.4641
2015-2016
District Chairs:

• District 1 Chair – Andy Eckberg Idaho Forest Group aeckberg@idfg.com (T) 208.255.3276
• District 2 Chair – Tim Schaffer Bennett Lumber Products
(T) 208.819.1214
• District 3 Chair – John Lillehaug
All About Forestry (T) 208.630.4076
Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year 2017
Wood Wizard Tree Farm,
Kurt & Sandy Koetter, Rathdrum, ID
The annual meeting of our ID Tree Farm Program was held March 27 during the Family Forest
Landowners Conference and Exposition in Moscow, ID. Both the conference and our meeting were very
well attended this year. Current Program President Russ Hegedus gave a rundown of 2016 activities
and those planned for the upcoming season.

The main portion of the meeting was the announcement of our recipients for Outstanding Idaho Tree
Farmer, Inspector and Logger of the Year. This year the award for Tree Farmer went to Kurt and
Sandy Koetter of Rathdrum. They began their journey just out of college by purchasing a wood lot
near Bonners Ferry. Later they found 13 acres near Rathdrum where Sandy was teaching. As the years
went by they continued to purchase adjacent parcels until finally reaching the current total of 113
acres in their Wood Wizard Tree Farm.

The Koetters have been active through the years in Idaho Forest Owners Association, Tree Farm,
Master Forest Steward Program, and the Idaho State Forestry Contest. Kurt served many years as the
advisor for the Post Falls High School team, and they opened their Tree Farm to many groups of
students as a place to learn about and appreciate forestry. One of their early pupils, Sean
Hammond, was enthused enough to make working in the woods his profession. Sean was able to pay back
a bit for his experiences with the Koetters as their Nominating forester for this well deserved
award!

ITFC President Russ Hegedus and Vice President Sean Hammond presenting the Koetter’s their plaque
for ID Outstanding Tree Farmer of the Year 2017

Page 2 of 8 Idaho Tree Farm Program 2017 Annual Meeting (continued
from page 1)
Kurt and Sandy have spent a great deal of “sweat equity” over the years in stand improvements such
as planting, road stabilization, precommercial thinning, and watershed restoration. They continue
to harvest a few loads each year to keep up with growth & mortality. Wildlife flourish on the
parcel and the view looking out over the prairie is definitely something to behold. You will all
get a chance to see it in person when we hold the Fall Tour on their Tree Farm this September, so
make plans to join us. Congratulations Kurt and Sandy!!
Also recognized at our awards program is the recipient for Idaho Outstanding Tree Farm Inspector of
the Year. Our Inspectors remain the backbone of all the state programs and we appreciate their
efforts greatly.

The Outstanding Inspector this year is Chris Gerhart, Private Forestry Specialist for the ID Dept
of Lands in the Clearwater Area.

Chris has been active with both the Forest Stewardship and Tree Farm programs for a number of
years. During our recent certification audit, he was very helpful in making sure all the Tree
Farmers selected for review in his area were well prepared and free of any issues. His efforts
were a big part of the reason our field audits went so well. His nominating Forester, Russ Hegedus,
says “Chris has a heart for landowners and doing the right thing for them”.

Well said, and a big “Thank You” to Chris from all of us for his hard work and dedication!

Chris Gerhart –
ID Outstanding Inspector of the Year
ITFC Past Chair Doug Bradetich (l) with John Kinne of Odenwald Forestry (r) presenting the
Outstanding Logger of the Year award.
As every landowner knows, a good logger is critical to doing a good job. For the last 25 years John
Kinne of Odenwald Forestry in Kootenai, ID has been doing above and beyond simply “good”. His work
on private tracts both small and large is great by any standards
& we are proud to name him Outstanding Logger of the Year. The true test of any contractor is
whether he is asked back for a return visit. John has an impressive string of family forest owners
that regularly seek him back for continued care of their parcels. In addition to his high level of
harvesting, John is also a Tree Farm Inspector and served a term as our District 1 Chair. He is
truly an ambassador for our program and an asset to stewardship in this area.
When it came time for the nominating Forester, Doug Bradetich, to log his own place he simply said
“My first choice was John”.

Page 3 of 8 Idaho Tree Farm Program
Forest Health Issues – What a Difference a Year Makes…
Tom Eckberg, Idaho Dept of Lands Entomologist

The last several years have been drier than average and forest insects, especially bark beetles,
are able to take advantage of drought stressed trees. Pine engraver (Ips pini) is especially adept
at causing mortality in dense, overstocked stands of lodgepole and ponderosa pines; and fir
engraver (Scolytus ventralis) kills grand fir of all sizes during droughts. Idaho Department of
Lands (IDL) Forest Health personnel responded to 20 bark beetle/drought requests for assistance
coming in from January-April 2016, mostly for pine engraver and fir engraver compared to five this
year. Drought puts trees into stress and lowers their ability to defend against bark beetles. Pitch
is the tree’s defense, and water is necessary to make pitch and move it to the beetle galleries to
try and push them out. When sufficient water is not available, especially when trees are growing on
marginal sites or in overstocked stands, bark beetle mortality is very common. So far in 2017, the
Coeur d’Alene area has five inches (50%) more precipitation than normal. This is very good news for
trees, not so good for bark beetles. As we know, weather can change and pretty soon northern Idaho
will be experiencing our normal dry summers. This means that we still have to follow best
management practices for bark beetles. Proper density management of stands is the best prevention
strategy. Also remember that the best time to harvest or thin pines is during the
mid-July to November time frame. Creating pine slash so it is available to pine engraver in the
spring is inviting trouble. Even though the threat is diminished when there is ample moisture,
mortality in nearby stands is still possible. Slash that is generated in the winter or spring
should be treated by burning (when safe), chipping or masticating, dozed trampling or large piles.
Consult US Forest Service or IDL management publications for more information on pine engraver
management.

NOTE: If you desire more information on bark beetles, Extension Forestry is offering a field day
on June 30 in Coeur d’Alene. See the Extension Forestry calendar article on the next page.

Page 4 of 8 Idaho Tree Farm Program Forestry for Southern Idaho –
Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Lucky Peak Nursery – 15169 East Highway 21, Boise, ID
We began partnering in a forest field day specifically targeted at the southern end of our state a
few years ago and it has become very popular with many of our members. This year the tour will be
in the Boise area beginning at Lucky Peak Nursery. It will start with a coffee social hosted by our
ID Tree Farm Program. Topics for discussion will include Forest Practices updates, the EQIP
program, and current forest health issues.

The group will tour Lucky Peak Nursery then board a bus for several stops on the Walker and
Baumhoff family properties. Items to view will include sediment control structures, tree planting,
results of a thinning and subsequent harvest in one of the Baumhoff stands, and rehabilitation
after the Pioneer Fire of 2016.

Here is an excerpt from the informational flyer:
“Whether you have 5 acres or 2,000 acres, this tour will give you a look at different management
practices implemented by family forest landowners. This program will allow participants to interact
with landowners, loggers and natural resource professionals through discussion focusing on managing
forest lands and applying various stewardship practices at each stop. The program will be
instructed by John Lillehaug & Tim Kennedy, Idaho Department of Lands Private Forestry Specialists,
Tom Eckberg, IDL Forest Health Specialist, and Forest Landowners/managers at each respective stop.”

USFS Lucky Peak Tree Nursery, Boise, ID Wednesday, May 17, 2015 (8:30 am to 5:00 pm) Meet at Lucky
Peak Tree Nursery15169 E Hwy 21 Boise, Idaho 83716
22 miles South of Idaho City on Hwy
12 miles north from I-84 Gowan Road on Hwy 21
. – Bus will be provided for tour

Please bring a sack lunch and dress for field and weather conditions.

For program questions contact Tim Kennedy at 208-334-3488 or email tkennedy@idl.idaho.gov

Upcoming Events on the Extension Forestry Calendar
The University of Idaho Extension Forestry Program does a wonderful job providing classes and
training for landowners. Here are some upcoming events for May & June:
Natural Resource Planning for Rural Landowners:
Creating Your Own Forest Plan– May 11 and 18, 2017 in Orofino Firewise Principles and Practices –
May 18, 2017 in Moscow Bark Beetle Field Day – July 30, 2017 in Coeur d’Alene
For a complete list of events log onto http://www.uidaho.edu/extension/forestry or contact:

Chris Schnepf (208)-446-1680 Bill Warren (208-476-4434)
Randy Brooks (208)-885-7718
(Coeur d’Alene) (Orofino)
(Moscow)

Page 5 of 8 Idaho Tree Farm Program
Idaho Tree Farm Program – Member Outreach Efforts
Over the past year, we have worked to increase outreach to our Idaho Tree Farmers. One of the
simplest ways to do this is to ensure Tree Farmers are being visited and inspected every 6 years.
We know that some of you are past due for this and our committee is working to bring the
inspections more current. To help facilitate it we have begun sending out postcards to individuals
currently listed in the program but showing as due for a field visit. Some of you may have
received one of these in the mail already. The postcards are being sent out in groups starting with
the members most overdue for inspection and working towards those most current.

The postcards ask three simple questions: Do you wish to be in the Tree Farm Program? Would you
like to schedule a field visit from an Inspector?, and Do you have a management plan to the current
standards?.

This will allow us to stay in contact with active members and help keep our database up to date,
which will also aid in subsequent program audits by our national office. If you happen to receive
one of these, please take a moment to fill it out and return it to our State Administrator for
action.

We have also worked to partner in more field tours, workshops and socials in order to better serve
our members and keep you engaged. If you have any other ideas regarding outreach efforts, please
let us know!

Idaho Forest Owners Association / Forest Seedling Program
2017 proved to be a banner year for delivery of forest seedlings to the four Northern Soil and
Water Conservation Districts. A total 193,000 seedlings were distributed this April.

All the seedlings are currently grown out in 8 or 15 cubic inch plugs, discontinuing the use of 5
cubic inch plugs. The larger are proving to be more vigorous.

This is the fourth year the IFOA/FSP has been distributing seedlings since assuming management from
the RC&D Program. Their first delivery was around 80,000 seedlings to the current delivery of
193,000 and continues to grow! The Program has a target of 236,000 seedlings for the 2018 grow-out

NOTE: Please order NOW for your 20018 and/or 2019 seedling delivery. These orders are processed on
a first come/first serve basis. Please contact your Soil & Water Conservation District for order
placement.

Benewah SWCD – 208-686-1699, ext 109 or email leann.daman@id.usda.net Bonner SWCD – 208-263-5310,
ext 100 or email amanda.abajian@id.nacdnet.net Boundary SCD – 208-267-3340, ext 107 or email
cassie.olson@id.nacdnet.net Kootenai-Shoshone SWCD – 208-762-4939, ext 101 or email
ksswcd@yahoo.com
Wood Family advances to Regional Level
The national ATFS office recently announced our 2016 ID Outstanding Tree Farmers of the year, the
Wood Family Tree Farms, are one of the finalists for the Regional Outstanding Tree Farmer of the
Year award. This is exciting news for them and our state as well. We wish them the best as the
process goes along. As those who attended the Fall Tour last year can attest, they are very
deserving of this honor.

Page 6 of 8 Idaho Tree Farm Program

Idaho Forestry Day at the Legislature

Shortly after the opening of each legislative session, particular days are set aside to highlight
the various sectors of business throughout the state. Our Idaho Tree Farm Program routinely takes
part in the day set aside to showcase forestry issues to our lawmakers. It is a great way to
reinforce what we do to the returning senators and representatives, as well as introduce our issues
to those new to the offices. This year Forestry Day at the Legislature luncheon was held January
31st in Boise, and was hosted by Society of American Foresters, Idaho Chapters. The featured
speaker was University of Idaho wood technology professor Dr. Tom Gorman, Ph.D., P.E., who
presented on innovations in wood products, and the potential for cross-laminated timber. The
luncheon was very well attended by legislators and members from forestry and paper product
industries.
ITFC’s John Lillehaug, Tim Kennedy and Savannah Miller attended and hosted a display at the event.
Next year’s FDAL Luncheon is scheduled for January 24th, 2018 in Boise.

Thanks Tim, Savannah and John for staffing again this year! (l-r) Inspector Tim
Kennedy, State Administrator
Savannah Miller, and District 3 Chair John Lillehaug at the Idaho Tree Farm Booth
Idaho State Forestry Contest – May 11, 2017 – ( 35th Anniversary!!)
Delay Family Tree Farm, Careywood, ID
One of the most anticipated events each spring is the Idaho State Forestry Contest. Each year since
1983 students, coaches and volunteers from all over the state gather at the Delay Family Tree Farm
in Careywood, ID as teams compete in 10 areas of forest management: 1) log scaling, 2) timber
cruising, 3) tree identification and tree planting, 4) map reading, 5) compass and pacing, 6) tool
identification, 7) soils and water quality, 8) tree health, 9) silviculture and 10) noxious weeds.

The contest has grown tremendously over the last 35 years and currently several hundred students
from 2nd grade through high school compete in Novice, Rookie, Junior and Senior divisions. The day
ends with a BBQ lunch and awards ceremony. This year appears to be on course to break all
attendance records. The staff indicates they are planning to feed as many as 900 people at the
lunch!

As you would think this much participation calls for a great deal of planning and volunteer help.
It is a very enjoyable day out in the fresh air with a bunch of eager students. Anyone wishing to
help out – whether you are an old hand in the woods or just getting started – can most likely be
put to good use.

For more info call Karen Robinson at ID Dept of Lands, Sandpoint ph 263-5104 or
krobinson@idl.idaho.gov

Page 7 of 8 Idaho Tree Farm Program

Events to Highlight

May 11, 2017 – Idaho State Forestry Contest, Delay Farms, Careywood, ID

July 20, 2016 – Idaho Tree Farm Committee Meeting, CDA, ID

Sept 9, 2017 – Idaho Tree Farm Program Fall Tour, Wizard Tree Farm, Rathdrum, ID
Stay Informed…..
In case you are ever wondering what is going on at the committee level, our Minutes are now being
posted on the Idaho Tree Farm Program website. Just log onto our website for Minutes of previous
sessions, contact information, upcoming events, and other news of note to help you in your Tree
Farm endeavors.
We’re on the Web!
Learn more at:
www.idahotreefarm.org

About Our Organization…
The purpose of the Idaho Tree Farm Program is to promote better forest management among
nonindustrial forest owners. The vehicle for achieving this aim is the American Tree Farm System®
(ATFS), sponsored nationally by the American Forest Foundation (AFF), state wide by the Idaho SFI
State Implementation Committee (SFI SIC), and administered by the Idaho Tree Farm Committee (State
Committee).

Welcome New Members!
The Idaho Tree Farm Committee extends a special welcome to the 36 newest Idaho Tree Farm Program’s
certified members. Thank you to the District Chairs and Inspecting Foresters for promotin
membership in the Idaho Tree Farm Program through the American Tree Farm System®.

As a current member, and a steward of the land, we appreciate your current support of the program
and your management of the forestland for pride and pleasure. Thank you for your continued
commitment to protecting watersheds and wildlife habitat, conserving soil and, at the same time,
producing the wood America needs and uses.

Tree Farm Member Acreage County Inspecting
Forester
Stanch Tree Farm 55 Kootenai Tim
Kyllo
Wurster Tree Farm 10 Kootenai Tim
Kyllo
Dunn Trust Tree Farm 42 Kootenai Tim
Kyllo
Maryann Denning 27 Bonner Tim
Kyllo
Charles Gordon 19 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
John Mott 350 Kootenai
Dennis Parent
Carl Dunn 18 Kootenai
Tim Kyllo
Henning and Patricia Otto 19 Bonner Tim Kyllo Fitzpatrick
Lakeview Powerline 1 22 Bonner Tim Kyllo Fitzpatrick Lakeview
Powerline 2 72 Bonner Tim Kyllo Fitzpatrick Lakeview Powerline 3
12 Bonner Tim Kyllo John Montandon
285 Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Dale Lunderse 1110 Nez Perce
Clark Christiansen
Josh Spencer 22 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Passer Living Trust 29 Kootenai
Tim Kyllo
Jaime and Susan Gordan 40 Bonner Tim
Kyllo
Ahren and Lori Spilker 18 Boundary Tim
Kyllo
Michael and Jacinta Rutledge 16 Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Cynthia Foot-Struble 10 Bonner Tim
Kyllo
Tom and Charlene Polek 22 Latah
Robert Barkley
Gary Van Stone 141 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Van Stone Oden Tree Farm 18 Bonner Tim Kyllo Gary
Van Stone Meryle Tree Farm 21 Bonner Tim Kyllo Dale Van Stone
13 Bonner Tim Kyllo Gary Van Stone
Brown Tree Farm 141 Bonner Tim Kyllo
Linden Timberlands, LLC 35 Latah
Robert Barkley
Larry Williams 40 Boundary
Andy Eckberg
Anna Marie Fels 21 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Mickey Leiding 10 Kootenai
Erin Bradetich
Mike Fritzsche 48 Bonner
Russ Hegedus
Leland Spindler 72 Bonner
Tim Kyllo

Page 8 of 8 Idaho Tree Farm Program
Welcome New Members (Continued from Page 6)
Tree Farm Member Acreage County Inspecting
Forester
Glen Rolofson 80 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Christian Fultz 20 Bonner
Doug Bradetich
Jory Gulman 14 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Paul Tallman 74 Bonner
Russ Hegedus
Doug and Lisa Gadwa 40 Latah
Robbie Easley

Congratulations once again to Kurt and Sandy Koetter 2017 Idaho Outstanding Tree Farmers of the
Year!

Make Plans to attend the Fall Tour on September 9th

Newsletter Spring 2016

Spring 2016 Idaho Tree Farm Program
204 E. Sherman Ave. • Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814 • (T) 208.667.4641 • (F) 208.664.0557
www.idahotreefarm.org • admin@idahotreefarm.org

Idaho Tree Farm Program Annual Meeting
2015-2016
Officers:

• Chair – Steve Funk
Edge Creek Tree Farm (T) 208.661.0644

• Vice Chair – Russ Hegedus
Idaho Forest Group (T) 208.255.3250

• Treasurer – Steve Cuvala
Idaho Dept. of Lands (T) 208.245.4551
• Administrator – Savannah Miller
ID Tree Farm Program (T) 208.667.4641
2015-2016
District Chairs:

• District 1 Chair – Andy Eckberg Idaho Forest Group aeckberg@idfg.com (T) 208.255.3276
• District 2 Chair – Tim Schaffer Bennett Lumber Products
(T) 208.819.1214
• District 3 Chair – John Lillehaug
All About Forestry (T) 208.630.4076
Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year 2016
The Wood Family of Sandpoint, ID
The annual meeting of our Idaho Tree Farm Program was held the first night of the 2016 Family
Forest Landowners & Managers Conference & Exposition on March 28 in Moscow. We have had a very good
turnout for the event the past several years and this one was no exception. Committee Chair Steve
Funk gave a recap of the happenings from 2015, most notably the audit review of our certified Tree
Farm Program. Only a very few items of improvement were noted by the auditors and our Idaho
management plans were praised as some of the best they had seen nationwide. A big “thank you” to
all the Inspectors and Tree Farmers that took part in this time consuming but worthwhile process.

The high point of our annual meeting is the presentation of awards for our Outstanding Idaho Tree
Farmer, Inspector, and Logger of the Year. This year we are very pleased to announce the Wood
Family of Sandpoint as our Idaho Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year! Jim and Virginia Wood, their
five children, and an ever growing extended family are long established members of the northern
Idaho area. Virginia’s family first homesteaded in the Gold Creek area northeast of Sandpoint just
prior to 1920, with Jim’s folks making their way there around 1940. Much of the country was cut
over and bleak in those days, but a lifetime of care and good stewardship has made it a beautiful
place to work & live today. As the family grew, they have continually added to their land base in
an effort to keep everyone together and engaged. Operations today include not only timberland, but
also cattle ranching, agriculture, commercial meat processing, road construction, a guest ranch,
and a community grade school. Wildlife is abundant throughout their ownership and care is taken to
protect the riparian areas. One item that greatly impressed the nomination committee

The Wood Family accepting their award for 2016 Idaho Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year

Page 2 of 7 Idaho Tree Farm Program 2016 Annual Meeting (continued
from page 1)
was the family’s involvement in the Forest Legacy Program. As a testament to their dedication of
keeping the land intact for future generations, in 2009 they placed 640 acres of timberland in the
Forest Legacy Program to be forever managed as a working forest. What a wonderful gift to give to
those generations to come! Congratulations to the entire family and we look forward to having a
great turnout this coming September at our Fall Tour on the Wood Family Tree Farms.
Also recognized at our awards program is the recipient for Idaho Outstanding Tree Farm Inspector of
the Year. Our Inspecting Foresters are a very crucial part of the Tree Farm Program and the award
this year went to Robert Barkley. Robert is with the Idaho Department of Lands, working out of the
Ponderosa Area Office. For the past 15 years he has been not only one of our most diligent and hard
working Inspectors, but also served continuously during that period as our District 2 Chair. During
our recent program audit he took the lead in working with the various Tree Farmers and other
Inspectors to ensure the southern half of our audit sites were properly prepared and ready for
inspection. He has been a familiar site for many years at countless field tours, clinics, landowner
conferences and other outreach activities. Though he has taken a very well deserved break and
stepped down as our District 2 Chair, he has pledged to remain an active part of our Idaho Tree
Farm Program. Thanks for all you have done and continue
to do for Tree Farming, Robert!
Luke (L) and Gary (R) Finney –
Idaho Outstanding Tree Farm Loggers of the Year
Robert Barkley –
Idaho Outstanding Tree Farm Inspector of the Year
When it comes down to boots in the dirt, a logging job is only as good as the logger on the site.
Our recipient for Idaho Outstanding Tree Farm Logger of the Year went to Gary and Luke Finney of
Harrison. The Finney family has been involved in logging for many years and is well known for the
fine job they do working with private landowners. During the field inspections the nomination
committee was very impressed with both their utilization of harvested material as well as the care
they give to the residual stand. Road work, culverts, water barring and slash management are all
well above par. To them, doing that little bit extra is just part of doing the job right and we
greatly appreciate their efforts. It has been said the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree and in
this case it applies very well. Luke’s father, the late Jack Finney, and Gary’s brother Paul
Finney, were also recognized as our Idaho Outstanding Tree Farm Logger of the Year some years back.
Nice job keeping the legacy going guys!

Page 3 of 7 Idaho Tree Farm Program
Forest Health Issues – Drought, Winter Storms, El Niño and Bark Beetles
Tom Eckberg, Idaho Dept of Lands Entomologist

The 2015 drought and warm El Niño weather made things difficult for trees in Idaho, and we are
seeing some of the effects now. Bark beetles often attack trees that are experiencing stress, and a
moisture deficit through the growing season stressed many trees last year. Ponderosa and lodgepole
pine mortality began to be observed in November, especially on drier exposures. Western pine beetle
and pine engraver were often found infesting the same stands. Damage was often worse in overstocked
stands. Some trees that were attacked last year are just now starting to fade to yellow and red.
Many small diameter grand fir and Douglas-fir trees have been turning red since at least November
in northern Idaho. Many have been growing on thin, rocky soils where the effects of the drought are
even more pronounced. Some trees may have been killed by the drought alone, but bark beetles are
also taking advantage of the stress. Fir engraver (Scolytus ventralis) is commonly found on grand
fir growing on drier sites. Secondary bark beetles have been found on small diameter Douglas-fir,
and in the branches of larger trees. In Douglas-fir, these secondary bark beetles (some with no
common names) cannot compete with Douglas-fir beetle, so they attack smaller trees, or in the tops
or branches of larger trees.
We expect the infested acres of fir engraver, western pine beetle and pine engraver to increase
during the 2016 Aerial Detection Survey due to the effects of the drought.
Wind and winter damage was severe in many parts of Idaho in 2015. High winds downed many trees in
November, and heavy snow loads toppled trees in December and later. Two bark beetles are of
particular concern when green, damaged pines or Douglas-fir are present in the spring; pine
engraver (Ips pini) and Douglas-fir beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae). Pine engraver is already
infesting green slash in the Coeur d’Alene area.
Pine engraver eggs being laid now will develop into adults that emerge in June or July to attack
standing trees. Douglas-fir beetle will be flying soon to attack down Douglas-fir, but new adults
will not emerge from these trees until this time next year. There is still time to salvage the
damaged pine before the new adults emerge in the summer. Infested Douglas-fir is not as time
sensitive, so it can be removed before the snow flies. On both pines and Douglas-fir, look on the
bark for piles of boring dust or frass to confirm if the tree is infested. Adult galleries will be
seen under the bark.

Grand fir poles killed by fir engraver near Harrison, March 30, 2016 (L). Small diameter GF killed
by fir engraver near Santa, November 17, 2015 (R).

Page 4 of 7 Idaho Tree Farm Program 2016 Forest Owners Field Day
Saturday, June 25th – Orofino, ID
The Forest Owners Field Day is a fun and informative opportunity for you to get together with other
family forest owners and improve your forestry knowledge and skill set. Experts from all across
the forestry spectrum will be leading workshops on items including forest insects & diseases,
logging safety, wildlife habitat, thinning & pruning your stand, reforestation, marketing your
logs, and much more. Regardless of whether you own a small tract or large, or whether you are a
greenhorn or an old hand, there is something of interest for everyone. The event is open to your
entire family; both young & old are welcomed. Pre-registration by June 17th is $20 per person or
$30 for a family of 2 or more. Registration at the gate is $30 per person or $40 for a family of 2
or more.
Event Timing – Gates will open at 8:00 AM, Presentations will be held through the morning at 9:00,
10:00, and 11:00 AM; and in the afternoon at 1:30, 2:30, and 3:30 PM.
Lunch – A catered lunch will be available for $10 with a deli sandwich, chips, cookie, and soda or
water (must be ordered no later than June 17), or feel free to bring your own picnic lunch.
Site Logistics – Walking short distances over nearly-level forested terrain is required. Portable
restrooms, drinking water, coffee, and refreshments are available on-site. Some seating is provided
at the stations and lunch area, but bring a camp chair if you have one. On-site non-hookup RV or
tent camping is available. For permission call (208) 476-7364. Be sure to dress for the weather and
wear sturdy footwear.
Directions – From the Orofino Bridge (Milepost 44 on Idaho 12), proceed East across bridge, turn
left onto Hwy 7, proceed North on Hwy 7 for ~0.1 miles, and turn right onto the Dent Bridge Road.
After 1.1 miles pass by the Lake View Road on your left. After 4.6 miles stay left, avoiding the
Wells Bench Road. After 4.9 miles stay right avoiding the Twin Ridge Road. At mile marker 11.1,
turn left onto Loseth Road, travel ~1.3 miles and turn left through green gate w/Tree Farm sign. Go
~.5 miles south to parking area. Follow the Forest Owner Field Day signs!
Registration – Register by June 17, 2016 to: Idaho Forest Owners Association, P.O. Box 1257, Coeur
d’Alene, ID 83816-1257. For questions or more info email to info@idahoforestowners.org or phone
(208)-262-1371.
Upcoming Events on the Extension Forestry Calendar
The University of Idaho Extension Forestry Program does a wonderful job providing classes and
training for landowners. Here are just a few of the upcoming events they are offering:
Pruning to Restore White Pine – June17, 2016 in Sandpoint Thinning & Pruning Field Day – June 18,
2016 in Plummer Forest Shrubs Field Day – July 8, 2016 in Coeur d’Alene
Forest Insects & Disease Field Day – July 15, 2016 in Bonners Ferry

For a complete list of events log onto http://www.uidaho.edu/extension/forestry or contact:

Chris Schnepf (208)-446-1680 Bill Warren (208-476-4434)
Randy Brooks (208)-885-7718 (Coeur d’Alene)
(Orofino) (Moscow)

Page 5 of 7 Idaho Tree Farm Program Idaho Tree Farm Program – Member
Outreach Efforts
When we voted last year to remain as a Certified Tree Farm Program, a couple requirements given us
by the National ATFS office were to ensure all members are reinspected within the 6 year standard
and that our database is current & correct. In order to help facilitate this we will be sending
out a post card sized mailer very soon asking some basic information about you and your Tree Farm.
We will eventually contact all our members, but will begin with the most long standing Tree Farmers
that show in our database as not having been reinspected in excess of 6 years.
When you receive your mailer there will be just a few basic questions. First, do you wish to remain
in the American Tree Farm system? If so, do you have a management plan? If you have a plan, is it
up to the current 2016-2020 Standards? Do you want to have an Inspector contact you?
Pretty simple and painless, but it will be a big help to us in cleaning up the database. The
return portion of the card will already have postage on it, so all you need to do is check the
appropriate boxes and pop it back in the mail to us. We all know that as the years go by parcels
are sold or added, family members pass away, and contact information sometimes changes. Ultimately,
we want to be sure we are properly serving you as Tree Farmers and that no one slips through the
cracks. Be watching for your card and please take a few moments to help us stay current and in
compliance with the requirements of our certification program. Thanks and we will be in touch!

Project Learning Tree Update
Project Learning Tree (PLT) is an award-winning environmental education program designed for
teachers and other educators, parents, and community leaders working with youth from preschool
through grade 12. Like the American Tree Farm System, PLT is also a program of the American Forest
Foundation that uses the forest as a window on the world, engaging the next generation of America’s
thought-leaders and decision makers.

Here are some of the upcoming PLT Professional Development Workshop Classes in Idaho:

Walk in the Forest – June 9/10 – Idaho City (camping available but not required) Focus on
Literature with WILD, WET and PLT – June 14/15 – Boise
Wildfires & Weeds – June 28/29 – Moscow
Focus on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) – July 21/22 – Lewiston or Cd’A Wildfires &
Weeds – July 25/26 – Boise
Focus on Literature with WILD, WET and PLT – August 3/4 – Post Falls Project Learning Tree –
October 21/22 – Boise

More classes are to be scheduled, check the website for the latest information.
Visit www.idahoforests.org/plt1.htm or call 208-334-4061
New Chairman for District 2
We are pleased to welcome Tim Schaffer as our new Chairman for District 2. Tim is with Bennett
Lumber Products in Princeton and will make a great addition to our Idaho Tree Farm Program. His
contact information is listed on the cover sheet if any of you wish to touch base or help welcome
him aboard.

Page 6 of 7 Idaho Tree Farm Program

Events to Highlight

May 12, 2016 – Idaho State Forestry Contest, Delay Farms, Careywood, ID

June 25, 2016 – Forest Owners Field Day, Orofino, ID

July 21, 2016 – Idaho Tree Farm Committee Meeting, CDA, ID

Sept 10, 2016 – Idaho Tree Farm Program Fall Tour, Wood Family Tree Farm, Sandpoint, ID
Stay Informed…..
In case you are ever wondering what is going on at the committee level, our Minutes are now being
posted on the Idaho Tree Farm Program website. Just log onto our website for Minutes of previous
sessions, contact information, upcoming events, and other news of note to help you in your Tree
Farm endeavors.
We’re on the Web!
Learn more at:
www.idahotreefarm.org

About Our Organization…
The purpose of the Idaho Tree Farm Program is to promote better forest management among
nonindustrial forest owners. The vehicle for achieving this aim is the American Tree Farm System®
(ATFS), sponsored nationally by the American Forest Foundation (AFF), state wide by the Idaho SFI
State Implementation Committee (SFI SIC), and administered by the Idaho Tree Farm Committee (State
Committee).

Welcome New Members!
The Idaho Tree Farm Committee extends a special welcome to the 61 newest Idaho Tree Farm Program’s
certified members. Thank you to the District Chairs and Inspecting Foresters for promoting
membership in the Idaho Tree Farm Program through the American Tree Farm System®.

As a current member, and a steward of the land, we appreciate your current support of the program
and your management of the forestland for pride and pleasure. Thank you for your continued
commitment to protecting watersheds and wildlife habitat, conserving soil and, at the same time,
producing the wood America needs and uses.

Tree Farm Member Acreage County
Inspecting Forester
Matthew Henningsen 960 Teton
Matthew Engberg
John Knous 40
Kootenai Diane Partridge
Dennis Mayer 19
Clearwater Chris Gerhart
Nick Albers 216
Clearwater Chris Gerhart
Rich Monteith 183
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Bear Tree Farm 64
Kootenai Gary Hess
Xann-Shapella Smith 30 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Mike Westhoff 37
Idaho Clark Christiansen
JeAnn Willson 93
Nez Perce Clark Christiansen
Jere Watson 384
Lewis Clark Christiansen
Oxbow Ranch LLC 2712 Idaho
Clark Christiansen
Mike Johnson 16
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Tim Brown 35
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Mike Sowders 21
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Brian Daniels 15
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Richard Brown 19
Bonner Russ Hegedus
William McCann Jr 2020 Lewis
Clark Christiansen
Neil Wimberley 27
Bonner Tim Kyllo
David Schunke 75
Valley John Lillehaug
IFG Timber Runge #1 Tree Farm 433 Kootenai
Tim Kyllo
Keith Olson 170
Latah Gary Hess
Eric Braunstein 10
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Clint Gray 30
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Spencer Hutchings 52
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Matthew Anthony 12
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Richard Rago 60
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Freda Campbell 19
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Pamela Hodaka 40
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Jake Hansen 13
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Pat Mason 73
Latah Gary Hess
Susan Degro 19
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Chris Courser 43
Bonner Tim Kyllo
IFG Timber Chilco Tree Farm 86 Kootenai
Tim Kyllo
IFG Timber Runge #2 Tree Farm 43 Kootenai
Tim Kyllo
Tom Martin 32
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Lloyd Wallace 19
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Larry Boyer / Boyer Ranch 840 Clearwater
Clark Christiansen
Bethany Ranch Home 67 Boundary
Tim Kyllo
Edward Tubbs 19
Kootenai Tim Kyllo

Page 7 of 7 Idaho Tree Farm Program
Welcome New Members (Continued from Page 6)
Tree Farm Member Acreage County
Inspecting Forester
Julie Ernest 94
Bonner Van Smith
Oxley Deep Creek, Inc 40
Boundary Tim Kyllo
Robert Reineke 28
Clearwater Chris Gerhart
Archie George 60
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Robert Tanner 40
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Roman Poplawski 19
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Patricia Hart 75
Boundary Tim Kyllo
James Jacobsen 38
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Russell Keyser 15
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Maryann Boseth 21
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Gene Soper 10
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
James and Elvina Doyle Family Trust 10 Kootenai
Tim Kyllo
Robert Young 10
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Phillip Henry 10
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Sean Rogers 10
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Mitch Belzak 30
Kootenai Tim Kyllo Carothers Mirror Lake Campground Tree Farm 10
Bonner Tim Kyllo Ted Leach
137 Clearwater Chris Gerhart
James Sharman TF3538 10 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
James Sharman TF3539 10 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
James Sharman TF3540 20 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
James Sharman TF3541 37 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Congratulations once again to our
2016 Idaho Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year! Make Plans to attend the Fall Tour on September
10th

Newsletter Winter 2015

Winter 2015 Idaho Tree Farm Program
204 E. Sherman Ave. • Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814 • (T) 208.667.4641 • (F) 208.664.0557
www.idahotreefarm.org • admin@idahotreefarm.org

2015-2016
Executive Committee:

• Chair – Steve Funk Edge Creek Tree Farm (T) 208.661.0644
• Treasurer – Steve Cuvala
Idaho Dept. of Lands (T) 208.245.4551
• Administrator – Amanda Cutting
ID Tree Farm Program (T) 208.667.4641
2013-2014
District Chairs:

• District 1 Chair – Andy Eckberg Idaho Forest Group aeckberg@idfg.com
• District 2 Chair – Robert Barkley Idaho Dept. of Lands
(T) 208.877.1121
• District 3 Chair – John Lillehaug
All About Forestry (T) 208.630.4076

2015 Family Forest Landowners & Managers Conference and Exposition
March 30 & 31, Moscow ID

“Forestry Q & A – Questions You Have and Answers You Seek”
You got questions? – We got Answers!! It’s that time once again to kick off the Spring and get
together with fellow Tree Farmers, Foresters, Industry and Agency representatives at the annual
Family Forest Landowners and Managers Conference. It will be held as in past years at the
University Inn Best Western in Moscow, ID. This year marks the 27th FFLOC and the planning
committee has geared this one to answer all those questions about your forest land that you have
been just dying to ask. This gathering has grown greatly over the years and come to be recognized
by many as THE premier landowner conference in our Intermountain area. Sessions have been planned
on topics including federal land management, prescribed burning, wildlife concerns, forest
taxation, project grants, tree planting and the unveiling of a brand new ID water quality video &
BMP booklet.
The evening of Monday, March 30 we will hold our Idaho Tree Farm Program Annual Meeting at the
conference. We will review the past year’s accomplishments, take a look at upcoming issues and
announce the 2015 recipients of Outstanding Tree Farmer, Inspector and Logger of the Year for
Idaho! The meeting kicks off at 6:30 PM with snacks and a social hour then right into the
evening’s program. The Idaho Forest Owners Association will also hold their annual meeting the next
morning on Tuesday, March 31 at 7:00 for all you early birds! Both meetings are open to all those
interested.
A flyer with more information on the sessions, a list of partners, registration form and contact
information is included with this newsletter and at www.idahoforestowners.org.. A full Conference
agenda will also be available on March 1st. Also, any of you that are Forest Stewardship
Landowners will be receiving a brochure with discount coupons for this event the first week of
February.
For those of you concerned about the future of your Tree Farm there will be a “Ties to the Land”
session on Sunday, March 29 titled – Your Forest Heritage: Planning for an Orderly Transition – An
Intergenerational Family Forest Project: lead by Kirk and Madeline David.
Lastly, all of you that volunteer as Tree Farm Inspectors will need to get trained up to the new
2015 certification standards this year. With that in mind we will offer an Inspector training on
Wednesday the 1st of April from 8:00 AM -12:00 Noon.

Page 2 of 6 Idaho Tree Farm Program Idaho Tree Farm Program Assessment
– June 2 – 4, 2015
As we indicated in our last edition, our Idaho Tree Farm Program is up for review and assessment by
PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) this year as part of our certification program. In early January we
met with a representative from PwC and Sarah Crow from our American Forest Foundation staff to
review the Idaho program and set up the list of field audit sites for this coming June 2, 3, 4. We
identified 24 Tree Farms throughout the state that were selected for review by PwC. The list was
sent out to our District Chairs so they can let the Inspector for each Tree Farm know which
properties were picked. The Inspectors will be in touch with the various Tree Farmers soon to
double check management plans, make sure everything is in place and look for any items that might
need some updating.

The assessment sites will be split into two groups of 12 each with a PwC auditor and some of us
from the Idaho Tree Farm Committee assigned to each group. We plan to visit 5 sites each on June 2
and June 3 then finish up on the remaining 2 sites with a half day of field review on June 4. The
PwC folks are asking that the landowner or other forest manager familiar with activities on the
Tree Farm be present for the field visit as well as the Tree Farm Inspector assigned to that
property. A copy of the management plan needs to have been made available to PwC prior to the
field day. They have provided us with a date schedule to have the plans submitted and if your
property was selected for review your Inspector will contact you to get a copy. Keep in mind the
assessment is of our State Tree Farm Program, not your own activities. The audit team will simply
want to review your plan, make sure it covers all the necessary items in proper scope and detail
for the size of your parcel, and make sure it reflects your current goals and your actions on the
ground. Since we have an entire state to cover in just a few days, the site visits will be
relatively brief. We are told to expect no more than a maximum of 1 hour on each Tree Farm.

Once the field assessment is complete we will have a closing call with PwC to recap their findings
and spell out any items they have identified for us to work on. We will let you all know of the
outcome and of anything we need to pass along to you or change in our program operations.
Thinning and Pruning Field Day – U of I Extension Forestry Class
JTurenees k1il3le,d2b0y 1ba5rkinbeSetalesnodrproootindits,eIaDses often make forest owners ask:
“What can we do about it?” Whether you have problems with insects or diseases, concerns about fire,
or just want to improve forest health and growth,
The response from foresters is nearly universal: thin your stand. This is especially true in
northern Idaho, where forests commonly become overstocked with an unsustainable species mix. To
help accomplish that the University of Idaho Extension is offering a field day all about Thinning &
Pruning your timber on June 13 at the Bonner County Fairgrounds just north of Sandpoint, ID.

“Thinning and pruning can favor better adapted tree species, increase forest resilience to drought,
improve tree quality, reduce fire risk, improve access, and enhance many other values. In this
program, we will discuss basic thinning and pruning concepts, then expand on those concepts in a
hands-on field tour.”

For registration questions, contact the University of Idaho Extension office in Bonner County
(208-263-8511). For program questions, contact Extension Forester Chris Schnepf (208-446-1680).

———————————————————————–
This is only one of many useful and interesting workshops the Extension Staff puts on each year.
Other classes in the upcoming weeks include Map & Compass for Family Forest Owners, Your Backyard
Forest, and Successful Tree Planting. For more info on these and many other sessions, visit
http://www.uidaho.edu/extension/forestry

Page 3 of 6 Idaho Tree Farm Program

New 2015-2020 Certification Standards Announced

As part of the Tree Farm certification process, every 5 years the standards for management plans
and activities on Tree Farms are reviewed and, if deemed necessary, amended. Recently, the
standards for 2015- 2020 were approved by the American Forest Foundation. In their news release the
AFF said:

“The American Forest Foundation (AFF) is very pleased to announce the launch of the 2015-2020
American Tree Farm Standards of Sustainability, effective January 1, 2015.

As a certified Tree Farmer, you are recognized for your hard work and good stewardship of your
woods. The ATFS Standards are an important tool that ATFS Foresters use to validate your good
forest management.

Every five years the Standards are updated through a transparent review. The recently revised
2015-2020 ATFS Standards include some key elements to further support you in achieving your
conservation goals on the ground. These include:”

• Emphasis on your objectives, as a landowner, and additional guidance in implementing
management strategies and techniques to help you accomplish your goals.
• Integrated approaches to help you address forest health and resilience in your woods
• Increased continuity with global sustainability frameworks and market opportunities,
including recognition by the Programme for Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC).
• Expanded recognition of the work you do implementing your State Forestry Best Management
Practices (BMPs) and its benefit for air, water and soil.
• Additional clarity about how to manage for the protection of threatened and endangered
species as required by law.

All of the current Tree Farm management plans will need to be reviewed by your Inspector and
evaluated against these new standards. At this point we don’t see major changes necessary from the
previous, but there may be some slight amendments needed in order to comply. Your Inspector will
also need to complete refresher training to these new standards before he or she can certify your
tree farm to them, and the training classes are now being planned. In the interim if you have
questions on your property or desire a site visit from your Inspector, they are being allowed to
continue with reinspections to the previous standards until March 15 of this year. In that way your
services as a Tree Farmer should continue undisturbed as we implement the new standards.

If you wish to view these changes in more detail we encourage you to log on to
www.treefarmsystem.org and click on “The Standards”.

Page 4 of 6 Idaho Tree Farm Program State’s Voice, State’s Choice – To
be or not to be …Certified?

As we have said previously, one big decision our program needs to make is whether or not to remain
a “certified” program. ATFS is allowing states to either remain certified or opt out as they feel
is best – This is under a policy they are calling “State’s Voice, State’s Choice”. One thing to
keep in mind though is regardless of whether we are certified or not the same standards for
management plans and activities will apply for Tree Farms. Each state program needs to declare
their intentions by 12-31-2015. We have been discussing it quite a bit over the course of the past
year and plan to take a vote at our next committee meeting on April 16, 2015. At this point we are
leaning strongly toward continuing on the certified program path, but would very much like to hear
from you, the member Tree Farmers, to be sure your concerns and preferences are addressed. Our
committee has asked for input over the last year, but so far very little has been received. This
may be due to a lack of understanding of what certification means to our members and to this
program. To be sure there is no confusion as we move forward, these are the main points to
consider:

What is Certification – In our markets today there is a growing move to promote sustainability of
our products and processes. This is in essence what “certification” is all about. There are
various entities that certify products, among them being the Programme for the Endorsement of
Forest Certification (PEFC), which is common in Europe; and the Sustainable Forestry Initiative
(SFI), which is more familiar in our country. Both of them recognize the American Tree Farm System
in their certification systems and consequently allow products from Tree Farms to be sold at market
under their logos. Currently ATFS is the only stewardship program that provides this market
distinction to private landowners.

What is the Cost – The main cost to being certified is the assessment and auditing that is required
of a state program. As we explained earlier in this edition, Idaho will undergo the field part of
this audit on June 2-4 of this year. So far the American Forest Foundation has footed the bill for
this auditing, but is currently suggesting an annual fee to each state program of $10 per Tree
Farmer up to a total maximum of $7000. If we decide to stay with certification, a plan for how we
intend to cover this cost needs to be submitted to our National ATFS office by 12-31-2018. Whether
all, some or none of this $10 charge gets passed on to the Tree Farmers, or whether we can cover it
by outside fund raising, is being discussed by our committee at this time.

What is it Worth – The ATFS staff continues to promote the value of Tree Farm products in the
marketplace as a major part of their outreach activities, though each company has to weigh those
values on their own. In 2013 Idaho Forest Group became the first company to announce a policy of
paying a premium for certified Tree Farm wood. Most of this goes to the landowner, but a portion is
sent to the Tree Farm program of the state the logs originated in. This has been a great benefit to
our program financially and will help us significantly as we move forward on the certification
path.

What Do I need to Do – On page 6 there is a response form for you to clip out, fill in your
preference on certification for our program and mail back to the Idaho Tree Farm Program office in
Coeur d’Alene. If you are receiving this by Constant Contact, then a reply via email back to
admin@idahotreefarm.org with your preference would be greatly appreciated.
Should you wish to send in your thoughts by phone, you may call the office number at
(208)-667-4641.

A wise man once said “The world is run by those that show up” – how true.
Please help us make the best decision we can for our Idaho Tree Farm Program.

Page 5 of 6 Idaho Tree Farm Program Training for Inspectors to the New
Certification Standards

This article is directed specifically at those of you who are Tree Farm Inspectors. Earlier in this
newsletter we introduced the updated 2015-2020 certification standards to Tree Farmers and the
associated updates necessary to their management plans. As an Inspector you will also need to
retrain in order to continue certifying Tree Farms to these standards. The final curriculum for
both the refresher course and the initial training to the new 2015-2020 standards was approved in
early January and will be made available very soon. With this in mind the ATFS staff in Washington
D.C. has given us direction as to how we can proceed. Depending on your situation there are several
options available as we move through this change.
———————————————————-
2010-2015 Standards:
If you completed training to the 2010 standards in 2013 or 2014 – You may continue inspecting to
these standards through March 15, 2015.

If you completed training to the 2010 standards prior to 2013 AND you have completed at least one
initial inspection or reinspection in the past two years – You may continue inspecting to these
standards through March 15, 2015.
———————————————————–
2015-2020 Standards:
If you fit in one of the two categories above – You may complete either a classroom training or a
one hour on-line refresher to the new standards.

If you are a new Inspector or do not fit into the categories above – You will need to complete a
classroom training to the new standards in order to be certified.
———————————————————-
Though there has been an allowance to continue to inspect to the old standards for a few more
weeks, ultimately all of our Inspectors will need to take either initial or refresher training at
some point this year in order to remain active. With our program audit coming soon, 16 required
reinspections on our plate for 2015 and the regular list of reinspections coming due each year, it
will be very important to keep everyone compliant in the program. We understand this is a big
undertaking and will work with you to help facilitate this.

As our program continues to grow we are working to add Inspectors all the time and our Inspector
Facilitators have been very good about scheduling training sessions as needed. We have been putting
on one or two each year and will likely need to do at least that many this year. Even though the
on-line course is available, many of you may prefer to attend a half day class session just to be
more up to speed on current practices. There have been updates such as an iphone app for doing 004
inspection forms in the field and changes to our database system that you may wish to discuss a bit
more with other Inspectors.

Our first training session is slated for the Wednesday after the upcoming Family Forest Landowner
Conference in Moscow. For any of you that plan to attend to conference this will be an excellent
time to get trained up to the new standards. Kirk David will lead this session from 8 AM until 12
Noon on April 1, meeting room to be announced at the conference.

Thank you to all the Inspectors and our Facilitators as well that take the time to make this
program work. We couldn’t do it without you and your dedication is greatly appreciated!

Page 6 of 6 Idaho Tree Farm Program

Events to Highlight

Feb 3-5, 2015 – Tree Farm National Leadership Conference, St Louis, MO

Feb 4-6, 2015 – Forester Forum, Coeur d’Alene, ID

March 30-31, 2015 – Family Forest Landowners & Managers Conference and Exposition, Moscow, ID

March 30, 2015 – Idaho Tree Farm Committee Annual Meeting, Moscow, ID

April 16-10, 2015 – Idaho Tree Farm Committee meeting. CdA, ID
Stay Informed…..
In case you are ever wondering what is going on at the committee level, our Minutes are now being
posted on the Idaho Tree Farm Program website. Just log onto our website for Minutes of previous
sessions, contact information, upcoming events, and other news of note to help you in your Tree
Farm endeavors.

Welcome New Members!
The Idaho Tree Farm Committee extends a special welcome to the 10 newest Idaho Tree Farm Program’s
certified members of 2014. Thank you to the District Chairs and Inspecting Foresters for promoting
membership in the Idaho Tree Farm Program through the American Tree Farm System®.

As a current member, and a steward of the land, we appreciate your current support of the program
and your management of the forestland for pride and pleasure. Thank you for your continued
commitment to protecting watersheds and wildlife habitat, conserving soil and, at the same time,
producing the wood America needs and uses.

Tree Farm Member Acreage County
Inspecting Forester
Margaret Bratcher 18
Bonner Tim Kyllo IFG Timber Pritchard Creek Tree Farm
148 Shoshone Tim Kyllo
Conrad Frank 20
Boundary Russ Hegedus
Dave Crandle 22
Boundary Russ Hegedus
Alan Williams 21
Boundary Russ Hegedus
Nokes Family Limited Partnership 560 Valley
John Lillehaug
Hickman Family Trust 160
Kootenai Mike Wolcott
IFG Murray Tree Farm 1,260 Shoshone
Tim Kyllo
Monte Winter 15
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Linda McPherson 14
Bonner Tim Kyllo

We’re on the Web!
Learn more at:
www.idahotreefarm.org

About Our Organization…
The purpose of the Idaho Tree Farm Program is to promote better forest management among
nonindustrial forest owners. The vehicle for achieving this aim is the American Tree Farm System®
(ATFS), sponsored nationally by the American Forest Foundation (AFF), regionally by the Idaho SFI
Implementation Committee, and statewide by the Idaho Tree Farm Committee (State Committee).

Certification and the Idaho Tree Farm Program

“Would you like to see the Idaho Program continue as it is currently as a certified Tree Farm
Program”?

Yes, I would prefer to continue as a certified program

No, I would prefer we opted out of certification Please check one box, clip out and mail this back
to:
Idaho Tree Farm Program 204 E. Sherman Ave Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814

Newsletter Fall 2015

Fall 2015 Idaho Tree Farm Program
204 E. Sherman Ave. • Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814 • (T) 208.667.4641 • (F) 208.664.0557
www.idahotreefarm.org • admin@idahotreefarm.org
ID Tree Farm Program Fall Tour 2015
2015-2016
Officers:

• Chair – Steve Funk
Edge Creek Tree Farm (T) 208.661.0644

• Vice Chair – Russ Hegedus
Idaho Forest Group (T) 208.255.3250

• Treasurer – Steve Cuvala
Idaho Dept. of Lands (T) 208.245.4551
• Administrator – Savannah Miller
ID Tree Farm Program (T) 208.667.4641
2015-2016
District Chairs:

• District 1 Chair – Andy Eckberg Idaho Forest Group aeckberg@idfg.com (T) 208.255.3276
• District 2 Chair – Robert Barkley Idaho Dept of Lands (T) 208.877.1121
• District 3 Chair – John Lillehaug
All About Forestry (T) 208.630.4076

Baumhoff & Co. LLC in Centerville, ID
“Looking to the Future…”
It’s been said you don’t plant trees in this part of the world for yourself; you’re planting them
for your grandchildren. How true, and what a statement that makes about your land stewardship
ideals!
For those able to attend the Fall Tour of the Baumhoff Family Tree Farm this past September, you
were able to see that ethic in action. Much of their land along the riparian areas had seen
extensive placer mining during the mid 1900’s and it has been a lifetime commitment of Oscar
Baumhoff to get it back into active timber production. The focus on this restoration was the driver
behind our choosing them for Outstanding Tree Farmer of the year. At first glance most sites seem
much too rocky and harsh for planting but in Oscar’s words, “The soil is there, but now it’s under
the rocks not over them”. Sure enough, an inspection of the overturned cobble found plantings of
pine, black cottonwood and willow taking hold and doing quite well. Placement of drop structures
and large woody debris in the streams are providing excellent habitat for water fowl and fish.
Also, their restoration activities don’t stop at the stream sides. On the remainder of the 3,200
acres, most of which is in timber production, the family has undertaken precommercial thinnings,
extensive replanting programs, and regular commercial harvests. In addition, they are actively
involved with hosting several community events and woods tours each year.
We had a great turnout for this event, with nearly 60 folks in total and a quarter of them coming
all the way from the northern Idaho region. Many of Oscar’s family members regularly take part in
the work on the Tree Farm and several of them were in attendance to help with the tour as well. The
group was treated to some breakfast goodies (the homemade cinnamon rolls were fantastic) and a fine
lunch catered by Trudy’s Café from Idaho City. Ducks Unlimited put on a slide show on all the
progress Oscar and his family have been able to accomplish with stream restoration.

It was great to see another aspect of forest habitat type as compared to northern Idaho. The
Baumhoff’s have done an excellent job restoring both the riparian areas and the forested land!
ID Tree Farm Chairman Steve Funk and District 3 Chair John Lillehaug present Oscar Baumhoff his
Idaho Outstanding Tree Farmer of the sign during the Fall Tour.

Page 2 of 6 Idaho Tree Farm Program
Fall 2015 Forest Health Issues
Tom Eckberg, Idaho Department of Lands Entomologist

Considering both the harsh, dry weather conditions this past summer and the significant wildfire
events, we asked IDL entomologist, Tom Eckberg for his thoughts on possible items Tree Farmers
should watch for. Here are his observations:
—————————————————————————————————-
—————————————————————-
Pine Engraver

2015 was a difficult year to be a tree in northern Idaho. The usual assortment of insects and
diseases were present, but the combination of a dry spring and summer with high temperatures
contributed to an increase in certain bark beetle activity. The active fire season (at least north
of McCall) will also potentially contribute to increased bark beetle and wood borer activity in
impacted areas next year.
The Idaho Department of Lands has responded to an abnormally large number of landowner requests for
assistance for pine engraver (Ips pini) in northern Idaho. Pine engraver is a native bark beetle
that causes most mortality in ponderosa and lodgepole pine. Most problems are associated with
logging activity that generates slash, or wind events that create blowdown. Overwintering
populations infest slash or downed trees in the spring and the summer generation will attack live,
standing trees in July and August. This beetle thrives in hot weather, where drought and high
temperatures stress living trees, making them more susceptible to damage. Outbreaks do not usually
carry over to the next year; the availability of green slash in the spring usually determines where
outbreaks occur. The overwintering generation does not typically attack standing trees in the
spring, but has been known to during periods of drought.
The best way to avoid pine engraver mortality is to conduct management activity in pines (harvest
and thinning) between the months of July through December. Doing so allows the slash to dry and
become unsuitable for the overwintering generation. There is always the temptation to harvest low
elevation pines during the winter because of ease of access. While not recommended, this practice
is often done successfully if certain precautions are taken to treat the slash. Techniques used
include creating large slash piles, creating a continuous supply of slash to contain the beetles
(green chain), lopping and scattering the slash, chipping or burning the piles as they are
generated. In a year with normal precipitation these techniques are often successful. With the dry
2014-2015 season, and another predicted this winter, careful thought should be given before
deciding to log or thin pines in the winter. Consult the IDL Forester Forum or the US Forest
Service Management Guide for more information.

Full links
http://www.idl.idaho.gov/forestry/forester-forums/id1.pdf (Forester Forum)
http://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5187526.pdf (Mgt Guide)

Western Spruce Budworm
Western spruce budworm (WSBW) is a native defoliator of Douglas-fir, grand fir, subalpine fir,
Engelmann spruce and western larch. In northern Idaho (north of the Salmon River), large outbreaks
are not common, the most recent one occurring between 2007 and 2012. At its peak, defoliation
reached over 650,000 acres. In 2015 defoliation in northern Idaho was approximately 11,000 acres.
In southern Idaho, large, chronic outbreaks are normal and have been recorded since the 1950’s.
Peak defoliation of over 3,000,000 acres occurred in the late 1980’s. Late spring freezes and other
weather events can severely impact populations. Spring freezes in 1986, 1987, and 2012 are credited
with causing the collapse of outbreaks. Defoliation in 2015 is expected to be over 1,000,000 acres,
after two years of relatively low numbers. The recent drought may have been responsible for some of
this increase. Long term defoliation by WSBW can kill understory trees and weaken larger trees
making them susceptible to bark beetle attack.

Page 3 of 6 Idaho Tree Farm Program Fall 2015 Forest Health Issues
(continued from page two)

Miscellaneous Insects

In 2015 there have been reports of unusual damage on Douglas-fir from two secondary insect pests.
The Cooley spruce gall adelgid is a common incidental pest of spruce and Douglas-fir. On spruce it
causes showy galls that look like cones. On Douglas-fir the damage is minor, sometimes causing
minor twisting and discoloration of the new needles. This insect will not kill either host, but
mainly causes aesthetic injury. A plantation near Emida was visited in July where most Douglas-fir
regeneration was affected, with yellow feeding injury visible on the new growth. Long term effect
on the stand was not expected.
Another less common insect, the Douglas-fir needle midge is causing widespread damage on new growth
of Douglas-fir throughout northern Idaho. This insect is a small fly that lays eggs on developing
needles, and the larvae feed inside. The damaged needles look like they are infected by Rhabdocline
needle disease. The difference is in the timing. Rhabdocline is usually most noticeable on the
previous year’s needles in the springtime. Douglas-fir needle midge is most visible on the current
year’s needles in the fall. While there have been outbreaks in the past in this area, serious
damage is not expected. There may be defoliation apparent next spring.

US Forest Service Field Guide: https://fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5188654.pdf
Douglas-fir needle midge damage on DF, CDA ID, 11/4/2015

Typical pine engraver mortality in dense lodgepole pine, Rathdrum ID, 11/3/2015
Changes in Idaho District 2
We are currently on the lookout for a Chair for Idaho Tree Farm District 2. IDL Forester Robert
Barkley has done an excellent job filling that position for us for a quite a while now, but after
14 years as District Chair he will be stepping down at the end of this year. We are sad to lose him
in that capacity, but we want to thank him very much for his years of service to the Tree Farm
Program and wish him the best as he continues with us as an Inspector. In the meantime we need to
fill this position and would like to hear from anyone interested. If you are or know of an
Inspector that would make a good candidate for us to contact for the area from Latah County south
to Idaho County, please let us know.
The main duties as District Chair are keeping track of inspection needs in your area, review &
approval of the inspection forms as they are turned in, and attendance at our quarterly committee
meetings. If you have a suggestion for this office, contact us at (208)-667-4641 or email
admin@idahotreefarm.org.
Thanks again Robert for all your hours of hard work and service!

Page 4 of 6 Idaho Tree Farm Program

Idaho Forest Owners Association Seedling Program (FSP) Update
(Steve Funk, Idaho Tree Farm Committee Chair)
The 2016 season will have approximately 150,000 seedlings to be delivered April 4. Currently,
107,000 seedlings are sold. These are purchased through the Soil and Water Conservation Districts
(SWCD’s) of the Idaho Panhandle.

The five species of conifers available each season are ponderosa pine, western white pine, western
larch, lodgepole pine and Douglas-fir. Some of these species sell out fast, so please consider
making orders with your District for seedlings in May to receive them the following season.

The four districts are:
Boundary SCD, Bonners Ferry Bonner SWCD, Sandpoint
Kootenai-Shoshone SWCD, Coeur d’Alene Benewah SWCD, Plummer

Orders will continue to be taken until the 2016 seedlings run-out or until March 21st, 2016,
whichever comes first. Then delivery will occur the first week of April.

The SWCD’s have ordered approximately 170,000 seedlings to be delivered in April of 2017. We hope
to be one of the many resources for landowners undertaking fire restoration projects.

IFOA FSP Program Assistant, Nina Ekberg, will be leaving at the end of the year. She is not going
away, just focusing on family. She says she will still be a volunteer with this project as it is
near and dear to her heart. IFOA/FSP wishes her the best for the future and a big “THANK YOU” for
her passion and commitment to the Forest Seedling Program!

Also, IFOA/FSP is pleased to announce that Julie Kincheloe (Heirloom Forestry) will be assuming the
duties of the Program Assistant starting in 2016.

Okay now, think about your seedling requirements. There are still some seedlings available for
2016, but they are going fast! So, plan ahead for 2017 to be assured of the species and the amount
of seedlings to fill your reforestation needs.

Upcoming Events on the Extension Forestry Calendar
Are you looking to increase your knowledge base and skill set on your Tree Farm? The U of I
Extension Forestry Program has a slate of classes, tours, and workshops for you to consider. Their
“Strengthening Forest Stewardship Skills: 2015-2016” calendar of events is out and it looks like
some great programs for you again this year. The folks at Extension Forestry always strive to offer
the most useful and timely topics possible.

There are over two dozen items on the calendar and it looks like there is something for everyone
with an interest in forestry. The list includes sessions on landscaping for fire prevention, rural
land purchasing, forestland grazing, stream restoration and current topics in forest health.
Workshops are planned for such things as pruning to restore white pine, setting up a thinning,
growing forest mushrooms, and controlling noxious weeds. In addition there is information on
several field days and conferences you may be interested in.

For a complete list of events log onto http://www.uidaho.edu/extension/forestry or contact:
Chris Schnepf (208)-446-1680 Bill Warren (208-476-4434)
Randy Brooks (208)-885-7718 (Coeur d’Alene)
(Orofino) (Moscow)

Page 5 of 6 Idaho Tree Farm Program
Wildfires, Family Forests, and Ensuring a Continued Clean Water Supply
(The following is an editorial by American Forest Foundation President & CEO, Tom Martin, printed
in “Roll Call”)

It was a challenging year for the West. Temperatures were higher than normal. The region
experienced the fourth year of a drought. Record low snowpacks resulted in low reservoir storages
levels from Oregon to Arizona. States such as California set water restrictions and asked residents
to consume 25 percent less water.
On top of this, the West experienced one of the worse wildfire seasons in history. More than 9.1
million acres burned due to wildfire, a level reached only four times on record. These forest fires
only highlighted the importance of water for westerners.
Yet people are not seeing that these two stories are linked.
If we are to protect the limited water supply for westerners, we must protect the forests that
support clean water from being decimated by wildfire.
What most people don’t realize is forests play an intimate role with clean water. Forests act as a
natural water filter and storage system, keeping water clear, regulating streamflow and reducing
flooding.
Though only 31 percent of the West is forested, 65 percent of the public water supply comes from
forests. In fact, nearly 64 million westerners get their clean drinking supply from surface water
that comes from these forests, whether they are publicly or privately owned.
While policy makers cannot fix the drought, they can help ensure the limited water we have is clean
by prioritizing protecting our forests and forested watersheds.
A new report from the American Forest Foundation unveiled an opportunity to do just that. It shows
that, contrary to popular thinking, 40 percent, or 13.5 million acres, of the forests and other
lands in important watersheds that are at a high risk of catastrophic wildfire across the West are
private and family-owned.
The report also found these landowners want to do the right thing. Citing polling data from Public
Opinion Strategies, it found family landowners are motivated to take action to reduce the threat of
wildfire and help protect clean water. However, what prevents most from doing so is the high cost
of implementing management actions.
Thankfully, there are near-term solutions that Congress can implement to support these landowners
and thereby reduce wildfire risk.
First, we need Congress to fix how it pays for firefighting. The cost to fight wildfires continues
to grow. As of September, the bill exceeded $1 billion for this year.
Under the current structure, the U.S. Forest Service and the Department of the Interior are forced
to fund their firefighting program at the expense of others, many of which are designed to get
ahead of the wildfire problem. Even with this, firefighting budgets are still not usually enough.
Therefore, the agencies must go back and borrow funds from these same programs to pay the
firefighting bill.
To avoid this vicious cycle, Congress should treat wildfire fighting the same way it treats other
disaster funding, especially for the extremely large and costly fires that need the most support.
Second, our policy makers need to find opportunities to stimulate forest restoration across
boundaries that incorporate private and family lands into the mix. Currently, authorities and
programs exist for collaborative efforts to reduce wildfire risk. But, most are implemented across
public lands (federal and state), and do not often include private lands. With forest ownership
resembling a patchwork in West, conducting forest restoration across an entire region will help
raise the resilience of the entire forest.
Lastly, it is important to recognize there will never be enough public funding available to solve
the entire wildfire problem. Instead, we must find ways to create markets that help landowners earn
the necessary income that reduces the costs of wildfire mitigation and forest restoration, thus
making ongoing healthy forest management efforts both ecological and economical.
If Congress implements these recommendations, we will address two serious issues in the West:
reducing wildfire risk on private and family lands and protecting the limited clean water supply.
Tom Martin is president and CEO of the American Forest Foundation

Page 6 of 6 Idaho Tree Farm Program

Events to Highlight

Jan 21, 2016 – Idaho Tree Farm Committee Meeting, CDA, ID

Feb 10-12, 2016 – National Leadership Conference, Seattle, WA

March 27-29, 2016 – Family Forest Landowners & Managers Conference and Exposition, Moscow, ID

March 28, 2016 – Idaho Tree Farm Program Annual meeting, Moscow, ID
Stay Informed…..
In case you are ever wondering what is going on at the committee level, our Minutes are now being
posted on the Idaho Tree Farm Program website. Just log onto our website for Minutes of previous
sessions, contact information, upcoming events, and other news of note to help you in your Tree
Farm endeavors.
We’re on the Web!
Learn more at:
www.idahotreefarm.org

About Our Organization…
The purpose of the Idaho Tree Farm Program is to promote better forest management among
nonindustrial forest owners. The vehicle for achieving this aim is the American Tree Farm System®
(ATFS), sponsored nationally by the American Forest Foundation (AFF), state wide by the Idaho SFI
State Implementation Committee (SFI SIC), and administered by the Idaho Tree Farm Committee (State
Committee).

Welcome New Members!
The Idaho Tree Farm Committee extends a special welcome to the 26 newest Idaho Tree Farm Program’s
certified members of 2015. Thank you to the District Chairs and Inspecting Foresters for promoting
membership in the Idaho Tree Farm Program through the American Tree Farm System®.

As a current member, and a steward of the land, we appreciate your current support of the program
and your management of the forestland for pride and pleasure. Thank you for your continued
commitment to protecting watersheds and wildlife habitat, conserving soil and, at the same time,
producing the wood America needs and uses.

Tree Farm Member Acreage County
Inspecting Forester
Bollacker Trust 113
Bonner Russ Hegedus
Sherry Otto 11
Idaho Robert Barkley
Kenneth Bowey 39
Latah Robert Barkley
Hickman Family Trust 160
Kootenai Mike Wolcott
Gary Faire 101
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Donald Blaise 43
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Mike Paul 117
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Stacey Rucker 10
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Shawn Rucker 10
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Steve Rucker 38
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Rucker Living Trust 16
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Mark Greene 10
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Lloyd Potter 14
Bonner Tim Kyllo Wally and Dawn Pfeiffer Joint Living Trust 32
Kootenai Tim Kyllo Scott Rucker
21 Bonner Tim Kyllo
Terry and Greta Johnson 30 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Ron Wood 25
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Hamilton Tree Farm 144 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Sherman Rucker 40
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Ralph and Judith Scott Family Trust 73 Kootenai
Tim Kyllo
Barton Hayes 68
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Jeff Gibbs 19
Bonner Tim Kyllo
William Stratford 10
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Renfrow Family LLC 16 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Fisher Ag. LLC Tree Farm 69 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Carey Tree Farm 18
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Congratulations to our Tree Farm Committee State Administrator, Savannah Miller, and her new
arrival!

Leo Samuel Miller was born Sunday, Oct 25th at 12:09 a.m. Weighing 7.05 lbs and 19 1/4 inches long.

Both he and his proud parents are doing well and we wish them all the best!

Newsletter Summer 2015

Summer 2015 Idaho Tree Farm Program
204 E. Sherman Ave. • Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814 • (T) 208.667.4641 • (F) 208.664.0557
www.idahotreefarm.org • admin@idahotreefarm.org

Join Us on September 12, 2015

2015-2016
Officers:

• Chair – Steve Funk
Edge Creek Tree Farm (T) 208.661.0644

• Vice Chair – Russ Hegedus
Idaho Forest Group (T) 208.255.3250

• Treasurer – Steve Cuvala
Idaho Dept. of Lands (T) 208.245.4551

• Administrator – Savannah Miller
ID Tree Farm Program (T) 208.667.4641

2015-2016
District Chairs:

• District 1 Chair – Andy Eckberg Idaho Forest Group aeckberg@idfg.com (T) 208.255.3276

• District 2 Chair – Robert Barkley Idaho Dept. of Lands
(T) 208.877.1121

• District 3 Chair – John Lillehaug
All About Forestry (T) 208.630.4076

For the ID Tree Farm Fall Tour
Baumhoff & Co. LLC in Centerville, ID
We’re Heading South… !
One of the high points in our Idaho Tree Farm Program is the annual Fall Tour of the state
Outstanding Tree Farmer of the Year. We have been up in the north end of the Panhandle the past few
years, but this time around we are showcasing an ownership in the southern end of our beautiful
state. The Baumhoff family of Centerville are our Idaho Outstanding Tree Famers of the Year and
have an interesting and fun day lined up on the 3,200 acres of timberland they are pleased to call
home.

We will have some time for socializing, a box lunch sponsored by the Idaho Tree Farm Program, and
stops showing various parts of their Tree Farm operations. The site has a long history of mining
and much of the Baumhoff’s activities center around restoration in aquatic areas, some of which we
will see on the tour. Other stops will show areas of reforestation, issues associated with working
in areas of differing growing sites, some examples of precommercial thinning, and how they have put
their management objectives to work on this large ownership. It should be a great outing for all
those attending, and we look forward to seeing you there.

Here’s a look at the agenda for the day:

8:30-9:00am: Coffee Social at New Centerville’s Community Center/Fire Hall (115 Grimes Pass Road)

9:00am: Welcome and Introductions – Idaho Tree Farm Committee Chair Steve Funk and District III
Chair John Lillehaug

9:30-9:40am: Load into bus or vehicles and travel to first stop

9:45am: Grimes Creek Stream Restoration Project: Pam – Trout Unlimited

Page 2 of 6 Idaho Tree Farm Program 2015 Fall Tour (continued from
page 1)

Agenda (Continued):

(Continued on Page 2)

11:00am: Timber Stand #1: Discussion about difference in growing sites – Oscar Baumhoff and John
Lillehaug

12:00pm: Lunch @ Community Center (or bag lunch in the woods) provided by the ITFC

1:00pm: Timber Stand #2: Discussion about different ownership management objectives

2:00pm: Timber Stand #3: Precommercial Thinning Project

3:00pm: Rye Flat Tree Planting Project

3:45pm: Travel Home

Travel Information to the Baumhoff’s:

Proceed from Boise to Idaho City on Highway 21 = 40 miles, about a 50 minute drive

From Idaho City head to New Centerville (county dirt road) = 8 miles, about an 18-20 minute drive

NOTE** From Idaho City, make sure to take the Centerville Road, (not Tamarack Road, as MapQuest may
try to route you).

To allow us to plan for adequate lunches and refreshments, please RSVP by September 1 to our Idaho
Tree Farm office at: admin@idahotreefarm.org or call our Administrator, Savannah Miller, at
208-667-4641.

If you have any questions about the tour, email John Lillehaug for information at:
allaboutforestry@frontier.com

For any questions during the day of the tour (9-12-15) the Centerville phone number for information
is: 208-392-4459.

Lodging is somewhat limited in the area, but here are a few spots to consider:

Idaho City Hotel Owner – Cinda Heron 215 Montgomery Street
(208) 392-4499
http://www.idahocityhotel.

Mountain Meadow Cabin 4 Mountain Meadow Way (208) 392-4589

Mores Creek Cabins
Lindsay (Day #) – (208) 914-1020
Ray (Night #) – (208) 284-3905
www.morescreekcabins.com

Trudy’s Cabins & RV Park
3876 Hwy 21
(208) 392-4151

Mark your calendars for September 12 and make plans to meet us there!

Page 3 of 6 Idaho Tree Farm Program Idaho Tree Farm Program Assessment
Results
After much work & effort from everyone involved with our program, we are pleased to announce we
successfully made it through our program assessment! We had a few minor items and some areas for
improvement noted through the process, but no major nonconformities on any of the 24 Tree Farms
picked for review. We would like to send a special thanks to the District Chairs, Inspectors,
Consultants and Tree Farmers that took the time to meet with the audit team and answer any
questions on the ground. We had wonderful attendance at each of the sites and the auditors all
indicated our Tree Farm management plans in Idaho were some of the best they had seen anywhere in
the nation! Congratulations to all of you that helped us succeed.

As noted, we identified a few areas to improve as we went along and the Inspectors will be going
over these with those folks involved. For the benefit of all our Idaho Tree Farmers, and to help
out in future program reviews, a couple of the more common items noted were:

Acreage incorrect in the database: As you buy, sell, or bequeath property, be sure to keep your
records up to date with your Inspector. Be sure the acreage in your management plan matches the
acreage in the ATFS system. This is especially important if part of your land is also in
agriculture through a stewardship or NRCS program. Only the acres managed as Tree Farm should be
in the ATFS database. Also, remember you can have a single plan for multiple Tree Farms, but each
parcel that is noncontiguous with the others needs to have a separate Tree Farm number assigned.

Missing Plan Elements: Each item in the list of standards needs to be addressed in your management
plan. Even if something doesn’t exist on your property, (i.e. endangered species, high conservation
value forest, special sites, wetlands, etc) that needs to be noted. It could be as simple as
stating “None known to exist” with a short description of who has visited your site, any resources
consulted, and how you came to your conclusion, but it still needs to be stated. Also, on several
Tree Farms the 5 year activity plan was outdated. As we know time gets away so be sure to look your
plan over occasionally and keep it current.
Other than those few items, we were in compliance and pleased with the things the audit team had to
say.
Thanks again to all those that helped out!

New 2015-2020 Certification Standards for Your Tree Farm
As we have mentioned previously the ATFS certification standards for the 2015-2020 period are now
in effect for your Tree Farm activities. There are just a few changes from the previous standards,
but you do need to get your management plans updated to remain certified with ATFS. The new rules
can be found at: www.treefarmsystem.org under “The Standards” tab. Also, those of you that have
provided us with your email address should have been seeing updates via Constant Contact the past
several weeks with a recap of each individual standard and what it entails to you and your
management plan (thanks Kirk & Madeline David for heading this up). So far we have sent out updates
on standards 1 through 7, with just standard 8 left to go. If you wish to see copies of these
articles contact our Administrator, Savannah at 208-667-4641 or email admin@idahotreefarm.org and
we can get you a copy.

As an aid in updating your plans, the folks at our National ATFS office have made a plan addendum
available to get you up to the current standards. It can be found at www.treefarmsystem.org. Click
on “The Standards” and choose “Learn More” on the “View the New Standards” box. You will see a link
to 2015 ATFS addendum that will lead you through the update.

Page 4 of 6 Idaho Tree Farm Program

University of Idaho Experimental Forest
“Working Forests Field Day”
West Hatter Creek Unit, UI Experimental Forest Follow signs from downtown Princeton, ID Saturday,
September 26, 2015, 8:30AM – 3:30 PM

The students and faculty at the U of I Experimental Forest are constantly working to improve our
knowledge of forest ecosystems and devise the best practices for their care. Come out and spend a
day in the woods with them and see a little of what they are achieving with this interesting and
informative Field Day.
Here is some of what this event will be offering:

Workshops and Demonstrations

• Forest management planning
• Tree and shrub ID
• Dutch oven cooking
• Insects and disease
• Wildlife in managed forests
• Even and uneven-aged silviculture
• Non-timber forest products
• Radiotelemetry
• Equipment demonstrations
• Thinning and pruning
• Geocaching
• Prescribed burning primer

Research and Results Field Tour

• Fire behavior in masticated fuels
• Biomass utilization impacts
• Cost effectiveness of fuel treatments
• Using beetle-killed timber
• Birds in managed forests
• Sap flow and water use in thinned stands
• GPS tracking for harvest layout and safety in forestry and fire
• Herbicides for vegetation management in reforestation
• Small scale wood pellet production

For more information, contact:

Dr. Robert Keefe Forest Manager Assist. Prof. of Forest Operations
College of Natural Resource University of Idaho robk@uidaho.edu
(208) 310-0269

Dr. Randy Brooks Extension Forester and Professor
College of Natural Resources University of Idaho Extension rbrooks@uidaho.edu
(208) 885-6356

Bring lunch or purchase onsite for $12. Multiple field tour slots are available. For more info and
CFE and Pro-Logger credits, call 208-310-0269 or visit us online at http://www.uidaho.edu/experi
mental-forest for more information!

Registration: Registration is $30 and is due by Friday, September 18. On-site registration is
available. Registration after September 18 is $40.

The University of Idaho is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and Educational
Institution University of Idaho, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Idaho Counties Cooperating.

Page 5 of 6 Idaho Tree Farm Program
Logging Contracts and Liability Insurance
As part of the program assessment we spoke to earlier in this edition, the audit team and ATFS
staff had some suggestions for “recommended best practices” and “opportunity for improvement”.
These are not items such as the certification standards that are a must do, but rather useful
things they feel are important and would improve a Tree Farmer’s operations. One of these items
strongly suggested for routine use is having a written logging contract with your operator. Many
times landowners have a long term relationship with their loggers or other contractors and have
become accustomed to going simply with a verbal agreement. While this may have worked well for many
years, it is a risky proposition if something doesn’t go as planned. Having a contract of some sort
is just good business sense, regardless of the scope of the operation or tenure of your
relationship with the logger. It doesn’t imply anything about your belief in his honesty, but
rather it is a way to protect both you and the contractor and insure everyone involved is on the
same page with the activity being undertaken.
Just exactly how detailed and the particular language used in the agreement is completely up to the
parties involved, but there are a few basic items that are common to most service contracts. These
would include such things as name and address of both landowner and contractor, the location or
other description of the land involved (an air photo or map as well is helpful), a description of
the timber being cut and how it will be designated for harvest, how the property or cutting unit
boundary is to be marked and by whom, a description of the services being contracted, the price
for the services being contracted, terms of payment for this service, and the time being
allowed for completion of activities. The landowners need to be able to warrant they are the legal
owners and have marketable title to sell their logs. The contractor should agree to hold the
landowner harmless of any liability arising from his operations. Since this contract will be a
legally binding agreement and likely referred to by both parties should legal problems arise, it is
best to have your lawyer review it to ensure it covers all the items necessary for the work being
performed.
Beyond the written contract, don’t be timid about asking for references or to view some jobs the
logger has done. You can also check with your state logging association to see if the contractor
is up to date on any classes, training or accreditation in your state.
One of the main items to require of the logger is liability insurance. In our program assessment a
regular question the audit team had for landowners was “Do you require liability insurance and did
the logger provide you with a copy?”.
The best practice for both of these questions is “yes”! Working without insurance is a recipe for
trouble and most landowners said they required it of their contractor. It was not uncommon though
that the landowner did not also require a proof of insurance slip from the contractor. Asking the
question is a good start, but the next and just as important step is getting a copy of that
insurance binder for your records. Again, the level of coverage and exact type of insurance
adequate for your situation is something your lawyer should advise you on.
We are working with our D.C. staff to have some sample contracts and suggested terms posted on
their website for you to take a look at. We are also gathering some sample contracts here as well
to post to our Idaho site. As this information becomes available we will let you know.

Inspector Training – Are You Current?

Just a reminder that at this time all Inspectors need to be updated to the current certification
standards in order to continue with any inspections. We have had two trainings so far, one in
Moscow last April and another just recently in Hayden. There are still quite a few Inspectors that
are showing as inactive in our database and we would like to get you all current again. We had
planned to have another training session yet this year and would like to do so if the interest is
there. If you are interested in attending a session, please contact Savannah at 208-667-4641 or
admin@idahotreefarm.org or let your District Chair know so we can plan accordingly. We appreciate
your time as Inspectors and thank you for your service.

Page 6 of 6 Idaho Tree Farm Program

Events to Highlight

Sept 12, 2015 – Idaho Tree Farm Program Fall Tour, Baumhoff & Co, LLC Tree Farm, Centerville, ID

Sept 26, 2015 – U of I Experimental Forest Working Forest Field Day, Princeton, ID

October 15, 2015 – Idaho Tree Farm Committee Meeting, CDA, ID

Stay Informed…..
In case you are ever wondering what is going on at the committee level, our Minutes are now being
posted on the Idaho Tree Farm Program website. Just log onto our website for Minutes of previous
sessions, contact information, upcoming events, and other news of note to help you in your Tree
Farm endeavors.

We’re on the Web!
Learn more at:
www.idahotreefarm.org

About Our Organization…
The purpose of the Idaho Tree Farm Program is to promote better forest management among
non-industrial forest owners. The vehicle for achieving this aim is the American Tree Farm System®
(ATFS), sponsored nationally by the American Forest Foundation (AFF), statewide by the Idaho SFI
State Implementation Committee (SFI SIC), and administered by the Idaho Tree Farm Committee (State
Committee).

Welcome New Members!
The Idaho Tree Farm Committee extends a special welcome to the 25 newest Idaho Tree Farm Program’s
certified members of 2015. Thank you to the District Chairs and Inspecting
Foresters for promoting membership in the Idaho Tree Farm Program through the American Tree Farm
System®.

As a current member, and a steward of the land, we appreciate your current support of the program
and your management of the forestland for pride and pleasure. Thank you for your continued
commitment to protecting watersheds and wildlife habitat, conserving soil and, at the same time,
producing the wood America needs and uses.

Tree Farm Member Acreage County
Inspecting Forester
Bollacker Trust 113
Bonner Russ Hegedus
Sherry Otto 11
Idaho Robert Barkley
Kenneth Bowey 39
Latah Robert Barkley
Hickman Family Trust 160
Kootenai Mike Wolcott
Gary Faire 101
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Donald Blaise 43
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Mike Paul 117
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Stacey Rucker 10
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Shawn Rucker 10
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Steve Rucker 38
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Rucker Living Trust 16
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Mark Greene 10
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Lloyd Potter 14
Bonner Tim Kyllo Wally and Dawn Pfeiffer Joint Living Trust 32
Kootenai Tim Kyllo Scott Rucker
21 Bonner Tim Kyllo
Terry and Greta Johnson 30 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Ron Wood 25
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Hamilton Tree Farm 144 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Sherman Rucker 40
Bonner Tim Kyllo
Ralph and Judith Scott Family Trust 73 Kootenai
Tim Kyllo
Barton Hayes 68
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Jeff Gibbs 19
Bonner Tim Kyllo
William Stratford 10
Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Renfrow Family LLC 16 Bonner
Tim Kyllo
Fisher Ag. LLC Tree Farm 69 Bonner
Tim Kyllo

We look forward to seeing you on September 12 at the Fall Tour of the Baumhoff, LLC Tree Farm in
Centerville.

Hope to See You There!!