Summer Newsletter 2018-Idaho Tree Farm

2017-2018
Officers:
President –Russ Hegedus
Idaho Forest Group
(T) 208.255.3250

•  Vice President –
Sean Hammond
(T) 208.610.8754

•  Treasurer –
Steve Cuvala
Idaho Dept. of Lands
(T) 208.245.4551

•  Administrator –
Colleen Meek
ID Tree Farm Progra

admin@idahotreefarm.org

(T) 208.667.4641 Ex 503

2017-2018
District Chairs:

•   District 1 Chair –
Andy Eckberg
Idaho Forest Group
aeckberg@idfg.com

(T) 208.255.3276

•  District 2 Chair –
Tim Schaffer
Bennett Lumber Products
(T) 208.819.1214

•  District 3 Chair –
John Lillehaug
All About Forestry
(T) 208.630.4076

Our annual Fall Field Tour of the Idaho Outstanding Tree Farmer of the Year is scheduled for September 8, 2018. Brian Kroetch will lead us through portions of his 6,000 acres in the Mica Bay Tree Farms area south of Coeur d’Alene. During the day we will view active logging and roads jobs showing how various prescriptions are being used to achieve the desired result on these working forests. We will stop at some of the white pine and larch plantations and discuss reforestation issues that accompany such a large acreage.

Other items to discuss are the challenges of working so closely in the wildland-urban interface near Coeur d’Alene, the relationship Brian has developed with the Idaho Fish & Game Department in helping manage access and game herds on the property, as well as working to combine sustainable forestry with the need for a sustainable income from the harvests.

As always, the tour is free and lunch & seating will be provided.     The plan is to meet on the Mica Bay Land Company Tree Farm property adjacent to Highway 95 about 2 miles west of Coeur d’Alene Lake and Mica Bay around 8:30 that morning.     Coffee, doughnuts, snacks and beverages will be provided by the Idaho Tree Farm Program.

Be sure to dress appropriately for outdoor field conditions and have proper footwear for the woods. We will send out another notice with a map and scheduled itinerary for the day, but if you wish to contact us just email admin@idahotreefarm.org or call our State Administrator Colleen Meek at (208)-667-4641, ext 503.Hope to see you there!

Idaho Tree Farm Program

Fall Field Tour 2018

Kroetch Land and Timber

Coeur d’ Alene, ID

P.O. Box 2659 • Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814 • (T) 208.667.4641, ext 503 • (F) 208.664.0557
www.idahotreefarm.org • admin@idahotreefarm.org

 

Idaho Tree Farm Program Assessment – Coming in 2019

 

Part of being a “Certified” Tree Farm Program is the requirement every 3-5 years of a 3rd party assessment to ensure we are in compliance with all the current certification standards. We have been informed that 2019 will be the next audit/assessment year so we need to begin getting things in motion to be ready.       Early in 2019 officials from the 3rd party organization, Price Waterhouse Coopers, and representatives from our National ATFS office will travel to Idaho and decide on which parcels to visit. Our record keeping and procedures will be checked, but the main thing for member Tree Farmers to address will be your management plans. If you haven’t regularly done so, now would be a good time to locate, dust off, and update as necessary your management plan to ensure it complies with the current certification standards.       If you are unsure or have any questions on any of this, contact your Inspecting Forester or call our state office at 208-667-4641 Ext 503 or email to admin@idahotreefarm.org.
Two Idaho Tree Farm Committee Positions Filled
We are pleased to recognize two volunteers that have agreed to fill spots on our state committee.

Mary Fritz, Certification Chair.       Mary is a long time IDL employee who earlier worked on the Clearwater as a private forestry specialist and has been living in the Silver Valley since moving to Cataldo to fill a position as a private forestry specialist. Currently Mary works as program manager in forest stewardship in CDA.

Matt Engberg, Inspecting Forester Chair. Matt, a University of Idaho graduate, has been a Northwest Management Inc employee from the early 90’s to present.  Matt’s career started out falling snags on a wildland fire crew and then cruising timber, ran planting programs, precommercial thinning programs, timber sale layout & admin along with building roads and installing bridges, working wildland and prescribed fire programs for NMI and last but not least helping with Idaho tree farm on the Palouse.

Welcome aboard and thanks to both of you for stepping up to help our program!

Know Any “Outstanding” Candidates ??
Each year we honor some folks that have gone a bit above and beyond in the care for their land or the improvement of our program.       An Idaho Outstanding Tree Farmer, Inspecting Forester, and Logger is chosen from among our ranks and showcased during our annual meeting at the Family Forest Landowners & Managers Conference in Moscow. We are in the midst right now of choosing our candidates for 2019 so if you know of a particular Tree Farmer, logger, or Inspecting Forester that has gone the extra mile, please let us know.

As we all know the workings of our program and the fine stewardship done on your land doesn’t happen on its own. It takes all of the dedicated volunteers working together and we want to honor those that are in the blue ribbon class. If you know of a particularly well cared for parcel, a logger that goes beyond what is required to make things shine, or an Inspector that is especially helpful to landowners, give us a all or email a note for us to consider them for special recognition.

 

Idaho Forest Products Commission – Sustainable Forestry Tour

 

Each year the Idaho Forest Products Commission (IFPC) puts on a week-long tour for educators covering everything from soup to nuts regarding forestry in Idaho. In the IFPC wordsThey are immersed in the social, economic and ecological aspects of sustainable forestry, and receive proven activities and materials to take back to the classroom.” Our program thinks very highly of this outreach and sponsors an educator each year. Here is some feedback from one of the educators that took part in the 2018 tour:

“The Sustainable Forestry Tour has been the best short-term professional development experience I have taken part in during my 22 years as a teacher.  The Idaho Forest Products Commission (IFPC) team did an outstanding job of handling logistics and being continual educators throughout the tour. I participated in several activities where I plan to use either the teaching strategy or the content of the lesson.  I gained a greater appreciation for our forests and the importance of managing them well. By the end of the tour I found myself wishing I was a lobbyist that could get policymakers to be a part of this tour. I believe the most effective, transformative way to get the information we gained this week into the hands of policy makers would be to have them participate in this tour in its entirety.  Trying to gain the same level of information and appreciation for the information through reading or listening to lobbyists, or even participation in a one-day conference is simply not as effective as being immersed in the activities we did, including touring the facilities and job sites we had the privilege of seeing. I will definitely be recommending this tour to my colleagues in education.  

In addition, my husband, Sean Hammond has been a sawyer for several area logging contractors for most of the last 30 years. This tour gave me a much greater appreciation for the work my husband does and the entire forestry industry.  At each tour stop, I found myself delighted in knowing some of what was being taught because of what Sean has taught me and our children. By the end of the week I found myself with a significant degree of pride in what my he does, his care for the land, and his integrity as now a private one-man logging operation.” 

Thank you Idaho Tree Farm for your sponsorship and participation in this incredible opportunity. 

Sincerely, Virginia Hammond

 

 

Idaho Master Forest Stewards Program Accepting Applications

University of Idaho Extension is seeking candidates for the Idaho Master Forest Stewards (IMFS) program. The Idaho Master Forest Stewards program was co-designed with forest owners to increase participants’ forestry knowledge and skills; enable them to provide educational assistance to forest owners and other groups; and provide a forum for richer peer to peer learning among forest owners. Over 100 people have participated in the program thus far.

Applications for the IMFS program are accepted continually. When we have at least ten applications by August of a given year, we schedule IMFS core sessions for the next. We are very close to reaching that threshold, so if you are currently interested in taking the training in 2019, send an application in August 2018. More information on becoming an Idaho Master Forest Steward and application materials can be downloaded at:

www.uidaho.edu/extension/forestry/panhandle/programs/master-stewards.

The largest portion of the 2019 training would take place during four, one-day sessions held April thru September.

 

Put your Forest Plan into Action

Across the state, the Idaho Department of Lands employs Private Forestry Specialists (PFS) whose primary role is to provide forest landowners with information to help them meet their forest management goals. Our PFSs provide planning advice, assess insect and disease threats and design a variety of practices to help you manage your land. Some of these practices include thinning, tree planting, forest health improvement and fuel breaks. We collaborate with a wide variety of resource professionals and are long-time and strong supporters of the Idaho Tree Farm Program.

For landowner’s writing a forest management plan, IDL’s Forest Stewardship Program staff collaborated with the Idaho Tree Farm Program and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to develop the One Plan Template. Each of these three programs require a management plan and by working together, the One Plan allows a landowner to easily sign up for all three programs.

The Idaho Department of Lands administers the Forest Stewardship Program, a national program that provides funding to IDL to assist forest landowners. To become a Forest Steward, landowners must develop a management plan. The benefit of participating in Idaho’s Forest Stewardship Program includes a free site visit every five years and access to conference and educational opportunities. Many of our staff are also Tree Farm Inspectors that can enroll you in the Tree Farm Program.

You will find the One Plan Template on the Idaho Department of Lands Forestry Assistance webpage https://www.idl.idaho.gov/

If you need advice or technical assistance, you can call your nearest Private Forest Specialist for an appointment. Our PFSs can be contacted at anyone of these locations:

For more information on the Idaho Forest Stewardship Program contact Mary Fritz, mfritz@idl.idaho.gov or phone 208-666-8667.

Wanted: Email Addresses
We are always looking for ways to reduce clutter and streamline our process. If you are currently receiving your Tree Farm newsletter by mail and would like to switch to electronic, please contact us and have your email address listed as your preferred method of contact. Just email to admin@idahotreefarm.org or call Colleen at 208-667-4641, Ext 503
Idaho “One Plan” for Tree Farm, Stewardship and NRCS

Mary Fritz, Forest Stewardship Program Manager, Idaho Dept of Lands

 

Brown Needles – Are My Trees Dying? 

Chris Schnepf – Area Extension Educator, Forestry

Most people love healthy green tree foliage. When a tree’s foliage becomes less green, or worse yet brown, people are understandably concerned about tree and forest health.

Extension offices across Idaho frequently get calls about brown conifer needles, especially in the fall and spring. Brown needle causes vary from normal tree physiology to a wide range of insects and diseases. Unless the whole tree is brown, some brown needles are not necessarily a problem. 

Fall needle drop. Deciduous trees drop all their leaves every fall. But non-deciduous conifers drop leaves too – they just don’t drop them all every year. Older conifer needles are less photosynthetically efficient than younger needles, as they are often shaded by newer foliage. Conifers drop these older needles because those needles take more energy from the tree to stay green than the tree gets in return.

Trees vary in how many needles they keep on the tree. Some conifer species can keep 4 or more age-classes of needles. Needle drop on lodgepole, ponderosa, and white pines is often most noticeable, because every fall, three-year needles turn brown and eventually drop. If a pine had particularly good growth 3 years ago, putting on abundant needles, that needle-drop can look dramatic, but dropping those old needles helps the tree.

Needle diseases visible in spring. A variety of diseases infect needles. The most commonly noticed needle diseases are those visible on pines in the spring. It is usually worse in the lower parts of younger trees and in draws or low-lying areas where humidity is higher. One of the most dramatic examples is Lophodermella concolor, which sometimes affects whole mountainsides of lodgepole pine at high elevations. Sometimes in the spring it can look like a whole lodgepole forest is dying, until the new growth comes on shortly thereafter. Most pine needle diseases are worse in the lower and interior parts of the tree – the least efficient needles on the tree. Sometimes they look terrible, but trees almost always survive needle diseases.

An exception occurs for trees planted from seed sources which were too far removed from the site to be adapted to it (“off-site” trees). These trees are often more dramatically affected by or even killed by needle diseases. Therefore, needle diseases could be a way to monitor changing climate. If needle diseases are killing many naturally regenerated trees, it may be time to consider assisting the migration of better adapted seed sources to that site.

Brown branch tips. Various insects and diseases can turn individual branch tips brown. Some of the most common issues with pines are gouty pitch midge, pine shoot borer, Diplodia tip blight, and western gall rust. Some small bark beetle species also kill Douglas-fir branch tips. These organisms usually only kill a few branches or tips – they almost never kill a tree, unless it is seedling-size. They are generally considered non-economic pests in the context of forest management. 

Larch commonly has needle issues in the spring. Western larch needle issues are usually caused by three factors: larch needle cast, larch needle blight, and larch case bearer. Larch needle cast starts as small yellow-brown spots which grow and eventually cause the whole needle to turn brown and fall off the tree. Larch needle blight wilts whole clusters of needle downward (they look melted, like a Salvador Dali painting), eventually turning them brown. Larch case bearers are tiny insects that mine the inside of needles, turning them straw-colored

(continued on next page)

 

Brown Needles – Are My Trees Dying?

(continued from previous page)

Good Neighbor Authority Field Trip

August 24-25 Priest River Experimental Forest

The Inland Empire Society of American Foresters (IESAF) would like to announce a two-day field trip to the Priest Lake Ranger District and the Priest River Experimental Forest (PREF).       The dates are Friday, August 24 and Saturday August 25th, 2018. On Friday, the field tour will look at and discuss the results of the Good Neighbor Authority in action. The US Forest Service and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) have pioneered this effort, and this will be a terrific opportunity for Tree Farm members, landowners and friends to see the first-hand results. The Good Neighbor Authority was recently expanded to include authorization for transportation that was not included in the original legislation. This new authority will be very helpful to expand and make the program more efficient and economical. This tour will begin at 10:00 a.m. by meeting to consolidate vehicles at the PREF. We will return to PREF for an evening meal and program for those that want to stay over for the Saturday tour of the Experimental Forest.

The Friday evening program will feature Dr. Russ Graham discussing the origins and history of PREF. Saturday’s field tour of the Experimental Forest will be a walking tour of the research projects in close proximity of the facilities at PREF. The travel route is on trails and roads covering generally flat and gentle terrain.

What to do if you are interested in possibly attending: Send an e-mail to inlandempiresaf@gmail.com stating your interest in one or both days, lodging, and meals by August 10th. You will be placed on our e-mail list for this field tour (only). You will receive a registration response with all of the final cost information and charges for your selected portion of tour.

and crinkling the tips. It is quite possible to have all three operating in the same larch tree at once. Some years are worse than others, but these maladies can look dramatic, particularly case-bearer. Luckily, none of these usually kill the tree. The wonderful thing about larch (in addition to root disease tolerance) is that it continues to grow new needles through the growing season. Trees that look brown in the spring are usually re-needled by mid-summer. The only impact might be slightly reduced stem diameter growth. 

Bark beetles? Root disease? If both new and old needles are not a healthy green, a tree is probably being affected by something other than needle maladies. If the whole tree fades over a period of years, it is likely root disease. If the whole tree turns brown within 6 months, it is more likely bark beetles. But if the symptoms are more like those described previously in this article, the tree will likely survive. Consider waiting before starting a salvage sale or cutting such trees for firewood.

If you are not sure, bring a fresh sample (and/or perhaps photos of the tree) into your local University of Idaho Extension or Idaho Department of Lands office.

 

IDL and US Forest Service are currently conducting the annual aerial survey of Idaho’s forest lands, and it looks like 2018 will be a big year for fir engraver (Scolytus ventralis). Fir engraver is a native bark beetle that attacks grand fir of all sizes. Trees that are under stress are most vulnerable. The dry weather during the summer of 2017 resulted in a surge of requests for technical assistance from private forest landowners in the spring of 2018. Minimize fir engraver damage by growing grand fir on suitable sites, avoiding drier aspects and rocky soils.

IDL personnel also received many calls from landowners reporting dead & dying Douglas-fir saplings. We have been seeing an increase in the occurrence of secondary bark beetles in small Douglas-fir. Scolytus monticolae and Scolytus unispinosus (Douglas-fir engraver) are minor bark beetle species that usually do not cause many problems. The dry weather in 2016 / 2017 is probably the main cause of this mortality. Most of the damage has been on sites with rocky or thin soils. As with fir engraver, maintaining proper density is important, especially if the soil is well drained or rocky.

Aerial observers are also reporting needle blight on western larch. This disease will quickly turn the needles red, and they will wilt and remain on the short spur. The disease is most common when conditions are wet in the spring when the needles are expanding. It rarely kills older trees, but can be mistaken for other, more serious problems. Fungicide sprays are rarely warranted, except for isolated small trees in ornamental settings. Increasing airflow (thinning) can lower infection by reducing humidity during the infection period (shoot elongation).

Aerial observers in southern Idaho report some Douglas-fir tussock moth defoliation in grand fir and Douglas-fir on the Payette NF southwest of Cascade Reservoir. Parts of the Boise and Sawtooth NF are also experiencing defoliation. Western spruce budworm is also defoliating grand fir and subalpine fir in parts of the Payette NF. With defoliating insects such as tussock moth and spruce budworm, selecting for nonhosts or less preferred hosts is a key management tactic. Pines and western larch are not commonly damaged by these defoliators. Damage is often worse in dense, multi storied stands with susceptible understory. Larvae feeding in taller firs or spruce will fall down on young trees, often causing severe defoliation. Grand fir is often more severely defoliated than Douglas-fir, so during harvest or thinning operations, grand fir should be discouraged as a leave tree.

IDL is receiving reports of “shiny, sticky” grand fir foliage and even broadleaf shrubs in the understory beneath grand fir. In 2013, there was a widespread outbreak of the balsam twig aphid (Mindarus abietis), a sucking insect that creates “honeydew,” a sticky, sugary secretion, which covers the needles and drips onto foliage below. This honeydew attracts attention from landowners, but trees are rarely seriously damaged. This honeydew is often a food source for insects such as wasps, yellow jackets and bald faced hornets, which can annoy woods workers. A good link to this insect can be found at this link:

https://tidcf.nrcan.gc.ca/insects/factsheet/5549. 

Late July through November is the ideal time to conduct thinning or other management activity in pines to minimize damage from the pine engraver (Ips pini). There is often temptation to time harvests or thinning during the winter through spring due to access, logistics or other reasons. Creating pine slash during these times can cause unwanted damage. Creating slash during the summer allows it to dry out and become unsuitable for overwintering adults and damage is often avoided.

Forest Health Updates, Idaho Department of Lands

Tom Eckberg. Forest Health Program Manager Idaho Dept of Lands

 

Events to Highlight

Aug 25-25, 2018 – Good Neighbor Authority Field Tour, Priest River, ID

Sept 8, 2018 – Fall Field Tour, Kroetch Land & Timber, CDA, ID

Oct 18, 2018 – Idaho Tree Farm Committee Meeting, CDA, ID

Welcome New Members!

 

The Idaho Tree Farm Committee extends a special welcome to the 4 newest Idaho Tree Farm Program’s certified members.     Thank you to the District Chairs and Inspecting Foresters for promoting membership in the Idaho Tree Farm Program through the American Tree Farm System®.

As a current member, and a steward of the land, we appreciate your current support of the program and your management of the forestland for pride and pleasure. Thank you for your continued commitment to protecting watersheds and wildlife habitat, conserving soil and, at the same time, producing the wood America needs and uses.

Tree Farm Member Acreage County Inspecting Forester
Gale Cope 30 Latah Robbie Easley
Richard & Maryann Fryer 146 Idaho David Summers
Greg & Janis Worch 20 Benewah Jim Nichols
Tim Andersen 17 Idaho John Lillehaug

 

Stay Informed…..

In case you are ever wondering what is going on at the committee level, our Minutes are now being posted on the Idaho Tree Farm Program website. Just log onto our website for Minutes of previous sessions, contact information, upcoming events, and other news of note to help you in your Tree Farm endeavors.

 

 

We’re on the Web!

Learn more at:

www.idahotreefarm.org

 

About Our Organization…

The purpose of the Idaho Tree Farm Program is to promote better forest management among nonindustrial forest owners. The vehicle for achieving this aim is the American Tree Farm System® (ATFS), sponsored nationally by the American Forest Foundation (AFF), state wide by the Idaho SFI State Implementation Committee (SFI SIC), and administered by the Idaho Tree Farm Committee (State Committee).

 

We hope to see you September 8 for our Fall Field Tour on the Kroetch Family / Mica Bay Land Company Tree Farms

 

April 18, 2018 ITF Committee Minutes

IDAHO TREE FARM PROGRAM

Idaho Tree Farm Committee Program

9:30am-12pm, Thursday, April 19, 2018

University of Idaho Extension Office Kootenai County – 1808 N 3rd St – CDA, ID 83814

 

  1. Call to Order

President Russ Hegedus called the meeting to order at 9:30am. Those present for all or part of the meeting      were:

Russ Hegedus, ITFC President

Sean Hammond, ITFC Vice President, Tree Farmer

Doug Bradetich, IFG

Erin Bradetich, IFTF Communications Chair/IFG

Andy Eckberg, ITFC District 1 Chair/IFG

Jane Thornes, PLT

Jim Thornes, Tree Farmer

Tim Schaffer, ITFC District 2 Chair/BLP

Steve Funk, IFOA/Tree Farmer

Janet Funk, ILRCC/Tree Farmer

Chris Schnepf, ITFC/U of I Extension

Colleen Meek, ITF Administrator

Madeline David, IFOA

Kirk David, IFOA

Tom Bollacker, Tree Farmer

Dan Meyer, Tree Farmer

John Lillehaug, ITFC District 3 Chair

Mary Fritz, IDL

Kurt Koetter, Tree Farmer

  1. Anti-Trust Statement

Russ Hegedus reviewed the Anti-Trust Statement with the Committee.

  1. Look over and review Q1 Meeting Minutes

Kirk David pointed out there was one correction in the minutes in New minutes, section j-IFO/Tree Annual Moscow Winter Meeting March 25th-27th, 2018. The word plague should say plaque. Sean Hammond approved minutes, Doug Bradetich seconded. Motion accepted unanimously.

  1. Review Q1 2018 Treasurer’s Report

Doug Bradetich represented Steve Cuvala in his absence at the meeting. The Treasurer’s Report Program Funding year to date $3,427.82. Beginning balance as of 1/1/18 was $28,097.66. Cash balance is currently $31,525.48 in the positive.

Doug went over the new budget for 2018. Russ suggested the rate $500 for Program Supplies & Equipment to raised to $1000, since projectors & screen are priced higher. Donation for the teacher tour was $250 raised to $500 and took off $250 on DC. Doug Bradetich moved to approve the treasurer report and Kurt Koetter seconded the motion. Motion carried unanimously. Sean Hammond moved approval of the 2018 Budget, Kurt Koetter seconded the motion. Motion carried unanimously.

  1. Communications Report

Communication Chair, Erin Bradetich, updated the committee that another newsletter should be coming out in another couple weeks.

  1. Old Business
  2. 501c3 Status and CPA Updates (Colleen Meek)

The CPA, (Matthew Peterson) sent in the 1023EZ report (Application for Recognition of Exemption Under Section 501(c)3 of the Internal Revenue Code) to the IRS which cost $275 to file on line. Colleen Meek called the IRS April 4th, 2018 to find out the status of the 1023EZ report. The report just went into review and it will take 4 to 6 weeks, around mid-May, to receive a written answer nay or yay from the IRS. The gentleman at the IRS did say to have the CPA file the 990N form, since it’s due May 16th. Colleen called Mr. Peterson, he will file the 990N form. When the letter is received from the IRS a copy will be sent to Mr. Peterson.

  1. Moscow Spring Meeting roughly 80 people in attendance.

Madeline David was wondering how DC will charge a Tree Farmer by the tree farms or per tree farmer for the cost of SFI certificates. It is actually by tree farmer. AFF will be passing part of the cost of 3rd party forest certification on the states. The committee decided to charge by tree farm but it will have a cap for the tree farmers that have multiple tree farms which will be $50.00. The $10 will go towards the 2019 audit also. Doug Bradetich made a motion to charge $10 per tree farm with a cap of $50. Kurt Koetter seconded the motion. Motion carried unanimously. Chris Schnepf suggested putting testimonials about the $10 fee in the newsletter. Mary Fritz asked, if everyone has a good email address. Not all tree farmers have an email address and there’s a few with bad addresses. John Lillehaug suggested that getting the monies from the tree farmers earlier, move the date up to July. John Lillehaug moved to have a committee get together to find out the correct number of tree farms and have a logic approach for implementing a billing system for the tree farmers. Chris Schnepf seconded the motion. Russ asked for volunteers to be on the committee. Doug Bradetich, John Lillehaug, Tim Schaffer, and Colleen Meek will be on the committee. The committee will contact Madeline and Kirk David to see how IFOA has handled their billing issues.

  1. UI Nursery Advisory Committee consolidated a seat for IFOA and ID Tree Farm.

Janet Funk talked about different representatives on the Nursery Advisory Committee. It was suggested by a member of the tree farm maybe they should consolidate the IFOA and ID Tree Farm voting position. Members of the Tree Farm Committee felt comments were misguided and unauthorized. It’s believed all tree organizations should have their own representation on the UI Nursery Advisory Committee. Kurt Koetter moved that to accept the letter that was written to rescind the motion regarding the “NIPF” (Non-Industrial Private Forestland) representation and restore the committee members to their previous designations. Sean Hammond seconded the motion. Majority in favor.

  1. New Business
  2. PLT Report (Jane Thornes)

ID-SFI annual meeting voted funding new units. PLT will be focusing on workshops, core subjects and activities for 6th to 12th grades. There were 43 teachers that went on tour. Stem outreach-grant ID State ED-donated by Clearwater Paper. There were nearly 200 photographs submitted. The Photo contest winners: Grand Price and winner 11-12th grade was Miranda Fry. 10-11 Kaden Grow, 7-8 Tegan Garrison and 5-6 Elise Pearse.

PLT offers Forestry Grants up to $1000 to schools and youth organizations for environmental projects. May is Wildfire Awareness Month.

Jane announced it would be her last meeting representing PLT. Mary Fritz will be taking her position.

  1. ILRCC Report (Janet Funk)

The ILRCC Assessment Core Team continues to work on the updates and revisions to the Forest Action Plan. Attention has been heavily focused on the forests “Threats and Benefits” section of the FAP.

The Western Fire Manager grants were reviewed and found to be within the scope of action, and the funding limits.

The LSR (Landscape Scale Restoration) projects were reviewed.

The Forest Legacy Program update showed that the Hall Mountain/Kootenai Valley project (3281 acres) has been funded. There are two other projects that are in “application status”. The Legacy Program, to date, has 30 purchased conservation easements on 95,768 acres, and 8 donated conservation easements on 2661 acres. Approximately 86,200 acres are open to public recreation, free of charge, in perpetuity.

 

A report on the Treasure Valley Carbon study was given. Among other things, it shows that tree canopy in an urban setting has more monetary value, for carbon sequestration, than the same amount of canopy in a forest setting.

 

  1. Forestry Contest Athol, Idaho – May 10, 2018 at Careywood-Delay Tree Farm-mile marker 454 W side of 95 – Forestry Contest will start at 9:30. Volunteers should arrive by 7:45a.m. Kurt Koetter needs volunteers to help clean up on April 20, 2018. On April 25th they will be setting up for the contest. Karen Robinson of IDL, is the organizer to contact if a person would like to volunteer.

 

  1. Forestry in Southern Idaho Tour, Wed May 16th, Council, ID.

John Lillehaug is the contact person regarding the tour. John said, everything is set to go. Russ Hegedus and Tim Schaffer will be attending the tour.

 

  1. Inspector training and certification chair (open)

Russ Hegedus said, the position is still open. Madeline David suggest asking a retired person that might like to help with the training for inspectors.

 

  1. Inspections update by District Chairs

Required: What has been assigned & what’s been turned in.

District 1 has done 7 required and 12 left. District 2 has 2 required to be done. District 3 had 1 required and that has been completed.

 

Optional and Pioneer’s What has been done?

There has been 8 optional done. There are 40 left which majority of the optional have been assigned to inspectors.

 

  1. 004 Form completion (make sure and fill all the appropriate areas)

 

  1. The vote on assessing each tree farmer a $10.00 annual fee per tree farm number to cover the cost of SFI Certification. The vote on assessing the tree farmer an annual fee of $10.00 was discussed earlier in the meeting.

 

  1. Kroetch Family Fall Tour – September 8, 2018 Prep:
  2. Brainstorm ideas and points of interest to assist landowner.
  3. Tour Attendance: How many might come, any guesses

Brian Kroetch wasn’t in attendance at the meeting. Russ Hegedus will circle back with Brian.

 

  1. Remind Landowners and Inspectors One Plan Template does include Stewardship.

Russ Hegedus suggested the inspectors remind the landowners that One Plan Template does include Stewardship.

If, they have Stewardship they can be dual involved.

 

  1. Other Business
  2. Next Meeting date: Thursday, July 19, 2018.

 

  1. Adjourn

Russ Hegedus adjourned the meeting at 12:00p.m. Doug Bradetich moved the meeting be adjourned. Sean Hammond seconded, motion carried unanimously.

 

Respectfully,

Colleen Meek

ITFP Administrator

 

 

 

 

Spring Newsletter 2018

Spring 2018
Idaho Tree Farm Program
P.O. Box 2659 • Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814 • (T) 208.667.4641, ext 503 • (F) 208.664.0557
www.idahotreefarm.org • admin@idahotreefarm.org
Idaho Tree Farm Program

Outstanding Tree Farmer 2018

Kroetch Land and Timber

Coeur d’ Alene, ID

 

The annual meeting of our Idaho program was held March 26 at the Family Forest Landowners Conference in Moscow. Turnout was great with over 80 Tree Farmers and guests in attendance.     Program President Russ Hegedus gave a short recap of the program and what’s new in Tree Farming then turned to our program awards for 2018. This year the award for Outstanding Idaho Tree Farmer of the Year went to Brian Kroetch of Kroetch Land & Timber and Mica Bay Land Company.

 

Brian’s family has a long history in forestry, starting with roots in logging & milling in Germany before some of his ancestors immigrated to America and incorporated in the area near Coeur d’Alene in 1921.     Over the years they have continued to acquire land and are over 21,000 acres today. Working on a sustained basis, they grow and harvest 5-6 million board feet annually. Brian says, “We are particularly proud of operating a profitable business for the family in a way that’s both sustainable and environmentally sound”.     Congratulations to Brian and his family!

 

2017-2018
Officers
•   President –

Russ Hegedus
Idaho Forest Group
(T) 208.255.3250

•  Vice President –
Sean Hammond
(T) 208.610.8754

•  Treasurer –
Steve Cuvala
Idaho Dept. of Lands
(T) 208.245.4551

•  Administrator –
Colleen Meek
ID Tree Farm Program

admin@idahotreefarm.org

(T) 208.667.4641

2017-2018
District Chairs:

•   District 1 Chair –
Andy Eckberg
Idaho Forest Group
aeckberg@idfg.com

(T) 208.255.3276

•  District 2 Chair –
Tim Schaffer
Bennett Lumber Products
(T) 208.819.1214

•  District 3 Chair –
John Lillehaug
All About Forestry
(T) 208.630.4076

 

 

 

Left to right – Vice President Sean Hammond, President Russ Hegedus, Brian Kroetch, Dana Kroetch.

 

ITFC Annual Meeting (continued from page 1)

 

Our Idaho Outstanding Logger of the year for 2018 is Luke Peterson. Luke and his wife Amy operate Northwoods Forestry near Sandpoint. His fine work may be familiar to many of you from our Fall Tour a couple years back as he had done much of the logging for the Wood family, our 2016 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year. Luke began his career in 2004 with just a saw and skidder. He has since expanded the operation to include a processor, buncher, several skidding rigs and a full-time employee.       Working with private landowners all around North Idaho, his gives a great deal of attention to leaving a site better than when he entered it. Good job Luke!
L-R – Northwoods crew member Matt Henry, truck driver Robert Laude (Woods Crushing and Hauling), Amy Peterson, Luke Peterson our Outstanding Logger of the year, Vice President Sean and President Russ
Also honored during our meeting were Outstanding Inspector and Outstanding Logger of the Year for 2018. The award for Outstanding Inspector of the Year went to Steve Cuvala, Private Forestry Specialist for the Idaho Department of Lands in the St Joe Area. Steve has been a long-time supporter of our program as both a dedicated Inspector and a Tree Farmer in his own right as well. In addition, Steve has served many years as our Idaho State Committee Treasurer.       President Russ thanked Steve for his long service to our program and presented him with a plaque and embroidered rain parka.
Steve Cuvala, Idaho Outstanding Inspector of the Year 2018

 

Forestry Tour for Southern Idaho

Wednesday, May 16 beginning 8:30 AM

 

Whether you own 10 acres of forest land or 2000, the Forestry Tour for Southern Idaho will provide the tools and information you need to improve the health of your private forest. If you want to harvest commercial timber, limit outbreaks of insects and disease, or reduce fuels near your home, you’ll learn some of the different management practices to accomplish your goals.

The Idaho Department of Lands brings the Forestry Tour for Southern Idaho to Adams County on Wednesday, May 16th. We’ll kick things off at 8:30 a.m. with a coffee social at the fairgrounds exhibition building, hosted by the Idaho Tree Farm Program. Then you’ll learn about “Bugs and Crud” that can affect your forest land, and how to estimate timber volume in “Log Scaling 101,” presented by IDL forestry professionals.

We’ll tour Western Timber Company and learn about their specialty lumber products and view a sawmill demonstration at a local mill. In the afternoon, we’ll visit two different private properties to take a look at examples of before-and-after recommended management activities, including pre-commercial thinning, bark beetle control and fuel reduction treatments.

Throughout the day, you’ll have a chance to talk with foresters and other resource professionals, loggers, and your fellow timberland owners. We limit the number of participants so that everyone has ample time to ask questions and discuss best management practices.

Register now by contacting the Adams SWCD office at 208-253-4668, or email aswd@ctcweb.net. The cost of the tour is just $10 to cover materials.

Please bring your lunch and dress for whatever our mid-May weather may throw at us.

Loggers and foresters can earn Society of American Foresters continuing education credits for this workshop. For more information, contact John Lillehaug, Private Forestry Specialist with IDL, at 208-634-7125.

This Idaho Forest Stewardship Program tour is brought to you by Idaho Department of Lands, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Idaho Tree Farm Program, and the Adams Soil and Water Conservation District.

 

Idaho Tree Farm Committee Approves Fee System
As we discussed in the last newsletter our parent organization, the American Forest Foundation (AFF), has indicated they will be passing part of the cost of 3rd party forest certification on to the states. We will need to put together an economic plan to show AFF how we will cover this cost and the Idaho Tree Farm Committee voted at the April meeting to institute a fee system for our members. We created a subcommittee group to look into the specifics implementing this system and the exact cost for each Tree Farmer we would need to assess in order to keep our program fiscally sound. The subcommittee will be reporting back at our next quarterly meeting in July with a recommendation of how to proceed.       As we firm these details up we will be passing that information along to our members.

 

Upcoming U of I Extension Forestry Classes
Nearly everyone has seen dead trees dotting northern Idaho forests. Most of the trees you notice were killed by bark beetles, but many other insects and diseases kill trees, often in less visible ways.

On Friday, July 27th, the Forest Insect and Disease Field Day will give participants first-hand exposure to a wide range of organisms that impair the growth of trees and forests in northern Idaho, including: western pine beetle and other bark beetles; Armillaria and other root diseases; white pine blister rust; Indian paint fungus, pini rot and other stem decays; and dwarf mistletoes. Experts will help participants identify insect and disease symptoms and discuss practical long and short-term methods of dealing with them.

Forest Thinning & Pruning Field Day to be held in Bonners Ferry, June 2nd
Trees killed by bark beetle attacks always make forest owners ask: “what can we do about it?” Whether you have problems with insects or disease, concerns about fire, or just want to help forest growth, the response from foresters is nearly universal: thin your forest. This is especially true in northern Idaho, where forests frequently become overstocked. Thinning and pruning can favor better adapted tree species, improve tree quality, reduce fire risk, improve access, and enhance many other values.
Forestry Shortcourse offered in Sandpoint, Wednesday mornings, June-July, 2018
Many Idaho forest landowners desire a better understanding of how forests grow and how they can better manage their forest property to meet their goals. Furthermore, forest landowners are often required to demonstrate planned, active forest management to qualify for lower forestry property tax rates and cost-share assistance for management activities such as thinning.

This summer, a 6-session program, titled the Forestry Shortcourse, will help enrich forest landowners’ understanding of forest ecology, silviculture, forest health, wildlife habitat, and other forestry topics. In the process, participants are coached by natural resource professionals on how to develop a management plan for their forest.

———————————————————————————————————

For more information on specific sessions in the series, contact Chris Schnepf at (208) 446-1680
“Forest Insect & Disease Field Day” to be held July 27th in Sandpoint

 

Forest Health Updates, Idaho Department of Lands

Current Projects Statewide – Erica Eidson. Forest Health Specialist

EDRR funnel traps placed near waste or recycling facilities
Another important reminder for this time of year relates to pine engraver beetle management. Now that the weather is warming up, folks are eager to start on forest management projects. Freshly cut (or storm damaged) pine is highly attractive to Ips pine engravers this time of year, as they are just beginning their first flight period. Fresh pine logs and slash on the ground are likely to become infested, and after about 6 weeks, a second generation of beetles can emerge from the down material and move into adjacent standing pine. We are starting to get some calls about this and seeing a number of new pine slash piles cropping up. Here are a few slash management suggestions for this time of year that might be a good reminder to help folks avoid problems with pine engraver outbreaks: https://www.idl.idaho.gov/forestry/forest-health/2017-single-pest-fact-sheet-pine-engraver.pdf

 

Currently, we are hard at work putting out MCH, which is an anti-aggregation pheromone of Douglas-fir beetle. It comes in small pouches or ‘bubble caps’ that can be stapled to trees for 1 year of protection against Douglas-fir beetle. https://www.fs.fed.us/foresthealth/technology/pdfs/MCH_handbook_11_15_508.pdf Recently burned areas with scorched Douglas-fir and storm damaged areas with recent (still green) Douglas-fir or larch blowdown are particularly good candidates for MCH treatment (Douglas-fir beetle can successfully attack and reproduce in down but not standing western larch). We treated several areas near Kamiah and will be treating additional areas in SE Idaho. Now is the best time of year to put out MCH, because Douglas-fir beetles will be emerging and looking for new hosts to attack soon.
This year, Idaho is participating in Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) surveys https://foresthealth.fs.usda.gov/edrr to monitor for invasive wood borers of deciduous and coniferous hosts, as well as for exotic species of Ips bark beetles. We are in the process of placing funnel traps (see attached photos) at 12 sites across the state and will be monitoring them for 12 weeks. We have selected sites in close proximity to wood waste facilities (i.e., transfer stations and wood recycling facilities) or areas that store imported goods with wood packing materials, such as wooden pallets (i.e., shipping yards, granite slab vendors). The idea is that potentially infested wood material may end up at these types of locations, and the EDRR trapping program could help us detect any new infestations at early stages, before exotic insects become established in an area.

 

Events to Highlight

May 16, 2018 – Forestry Tour for Southern Idaho, Adams County, ID

June 2, 2018 – Forest Thinning and Pruning Field Day, Bonners Ferry, ID

July 19, 2018 – Idaho Tree Farm Committee Meeting, CDA, ID

July 27, 2018 – Forest Insect & Disease Field Day, Sandpoint, ID

Welcome New Members!

 

The Idaho Tree Farm Committee extends a special welcome to the 8 newest Idaho Tree Farm Program’s certified members.     Thank you to the District Chairs and Inspecting Foresters for promoting membership in the Idaho Tree Farm Program through the American Tree Farm System®.

As a current member, and a steward of the land, we appreciate your current support of the program and your management of the forestland for pride and pleasure. Thank you for your continued commitment to protecting watersheds and wildlife habitat, conserving soil and, at the same time, producing the wood America needs and uses.

 

Tree Farm Member Acreage County Inspecting Forester
Ben & Farrah Zumhoff 200 Clearwater Matthew Engberg
Jake & Karen Rajala 27 Latah Robert Barkley
Scott & Michelle Schlader 21 Nez Perce David Summers
Michael & Marcia Stayton 182 Latah Robert Barkley
Sam Duncan 20 Latah Robert Easley
Brandon & Rene Creed 20 Kootenai Tim Kyllo
Alan & Debbie Flory Tree Farm #2 10 Boundary Tim Kyllo
Roady Tree Farm 193 Boundary Russ Hegedus

 

 

Stay Informed…..

In case you are ever wondering what is going on at the committee level, our Minutes are now being posted on the Idaho Tree Farm Program website. Just log onto our website for Minutes of previous sessions, contact information, upcoming events, and other news of note to help you in your Tree Farm endeavors.

 

 

We’re on the Web!

Learn more at:

www.idahotreefarm.org

 

About Our Organization…

The purpose of the Idaho Tree Farm Program is to promote better forest management among nonindustrial forest owners. The vehicle for achieving this aim is the American Tree Farm System® (ATFS), sponsored nationally by the American Forest Foundation (AFF), state wide by the Idaho SFI State Implementation Committee (SFI SIC), and administered by the Idaho Tree Farm Committee (State Committee).

 

Congratulations Kroetch Family! 

Make plans to join us on the Fall Tour of their Tree Farms September 2018

 

 

Idaho Tree Farm Committee Minutes-January 18, 2018

Idaho Tree Farm Program

Idaho Tree Farm Committee Meeting

9:30am-12:00pm, Thursday, January 18, 2018

Fire District #3, Kootenai County

1500 North 15th St. -Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814

 

1. Call to Order
President Russ Hegedus called the meeting to order at 9:27 a.m. Those present for all or part of the meeting were:
Russ Hegedus, ITFC President
Sean Hammond, ITFC Vice President, Tree Farmer
Doug Bradetich, IFG
Erin Bradetich, ITFC Communications Chair/IFG
Andy Eckberg, ITFC District 1 Chair/IFG
Jane Thornes, PLT
Jim Thornes, Tree Farmer
Steven Cuvala, ITFC Treasurer/Tree Farmer
Tim Schaffer, ITFC District 2 Chair/BLP
Steve Funk, ITFC Past Chair/Tree Farmer
Janet Funk, Tree Farmer/ILRCC
Chris Schnepf, ITFC/U of I Extension
Kurt Koetter, Tree Farmer of the Year
Dan Myers, Tree Farmer
Colleen Meek, ITF Administrator
John Lillenhaug, ITFC District 3 Chair/IDL
Owen Retzlaff/I.E.P
Mary Fritz/IDL
Tom Bollacker, Tree Farmer

2. Anti-Trust Statement
Russ Hegedus reviewed the Anti-Trust Statement with the Committee.

3. Review of 2017 Treasurer’s Report
Steve Cuvala gave the Treasurer’s Report Program Funding year to date ($565.02) and Doug Bradetich reviewed the 2017 Budget against actual income and expenditures as of December 31, 2017. All expenses are in line, Cash balance is currently $28,097.66 in the positive. Steve Cuvala was wondering what was the difference between Host Gator, Godwin (our maintenance for website) and Go Daddy. Approval of Q4 2017 Treasurer Report John Lillehaug approved and Doug Bradetich seconded. Motion carried Unanimously.
Treasurer Report as of January 16, 2018 balance $26,784.00. John Lillehaug moved and Doug Bradetich seconded to approve the Treasurer’s report as presented. The motion carried unanimously.

4. Old Business:
Janet Funk will represent IDTFC at the UI Nursery for landowner seedling needs. U of I Seedling would like a 20-minute presentation, since they have not heard of or knew what Idaho Tree Farm Program is. Janet has provided them some information to the UI Nursery Committee and read through it with the ITFC. Russ Hegedus volunteered to give a presentation, since research is vital to Idaho Tree Farm.
A few general observations discussed were: There’s various outlets for seedlings. It’s a person choice where they would like to get their seedlings. Larch seedlings are the hardest to get.

5. New Business:
a. Communications Report
Communications Chair Erin Bradetich updated the Committee on communication efforts with Tree Farmers. Erin Bradetich currently working on the next newsletter for distribution. There were 4 sets of post cards sent out about 250.

b. ILRCC (Idaho Lands Resource Coordinating Council) Report
Janet Funk said, there’s no updates. There will be a meeting coming up in CDA.,

c. PLT Report “It is: SFI” (Jane Thornes)
Project Learning Tree had 21 workshops. Each year roughly 400 preK-12th grade teachers and youth leaders participate in Idaho PLT professional development workshops. In 2017 there was about 24,500 Idaho students reached by the educators. There was 18 Grants issued to teachers.

The new E-units are ready for teachers. These units include lesson plans, student pages, and other supporting materials online. The standards pop up throughout the
E-unit, making it handy for teachers. Additional opportunities include Sustainable Forestry Tour for Teachers and Counselors, Forest Products Week Essay Contest, Arbor Day Student Photo Contest, Papermaking and Forester tools lending kits, Forest Education Grants, social media, and Natural institutes websites are increasing.

One sponsor, Idaho Fire Wise is backing out, is not coming through with $3000.00. PLT would like ITFP to donate $2000.00. There are also additional Funding partners include the IDL, US Bureau of Land Management, USFS, License Plate Fund, and various grants. IFG supplements’ when needed. PLT under SFI now, it was suggested maybe SFI would donate and suggested PLT should approach ALC and individual loggers.

Janet Funk moved to table on donation until Jane brought more information regarding who will donate. Sean Hammonds Second the motion. Motion carried.

d. New ID TFC U.S.D.S. Soil Conservation Service Rep, Kirk Sehlmeyer:
Russ invited Mr. Sehlmeyer but he wasn’t able to make it.

e. 501C3 Status (Russ Hegedus)
All steps are completed and 501c3 status is now in place. IFG can start making payments directly to IDTFC & rather than send payments to the National ATFS office. IDFT will do an Annual Tax Return with Magnuson & McHugh in CDA, ID
The cost for the tax return will be estimated about $150.00.

f. Data base clean up: 004 forms – legal description
Russ suggested that for legal description enter Township, range, section & the RP#.
It was discussed that a person cannot always find the piece of property just with that information.
Monthly, Washington will be sending out ATFS Data Quality Report.

g. F.O.R.I Guidance: See Hand Out
Russ asked everyone to look at the hand out for F.O.R.I., Idaho really doesn’t’ have F.O.R.I. but the landowners are in the driver’s seat. It’s based on the inspectors’ perspective and given the size and scale of the individual landowners’ property and scope of landowner’s objectives on their property.

h. Inspections Update 2018: Required D1 18 D2 2 D3 1
Optional D1 26 D2 16 D3 6
Pioneer D2 4

Tim Schaffer has assigned his requires for District 2. John Lillehaug has the required done for District 3. Andy Eckberg is going to contact the inspectors for District 1.
Russ informed the committee that there’s an opening available as the inspector Training & Recognition Committee Chair. The inspector cannot charge a tree farmer but can get a donation. Doug Bradetich suggested that they can put the opening in the newsletter.
i. 2018 NLC will be held in Albuquerque, NM Jan 31-Feb 2nd.
Sean and Russ will be in attendance. This year’s theme is “Bring Our Impact into Focus”.

j. IFO/Tree Farm annual Moscow Winter Meeting March 25th-27th, 2018.
1. TFOY Kroetch, LOTY Luke Peterson-Northwoods Forestry, IDTY Steve Cuvala signs engraved. Russ asked, Steve Funk to help with the signs and he agreed. Steve will plan for 3 smaller signs & 1 big sign. Sean Hammonds is going to check for the correct spelling for all plaques.

There’s a travelling plague for the Tree Farmer of the Year, it goes to the nearest IDL office but no one was certain what location the plague was last. Mary Fritz and Steve Cuvala are going to check at their offices.

2. Inspectors gifts and awards ideas: gift cards, hats, pens, vest, plaque for desk, Biltmore sticks. It was suggested looking in the website for Bob Falkner, for Tree Farm Promotional items. raisethebardesigns@gmail.com

3. At the ITFP annual meeting in Moscow, there will be a no host bar for the award ceremony and then dessert hour for the Idaho outstanding award recipients.

k. Thanks to Mary Fritz good efforts a donation should be made to IDTF from Joyce Thompson, a retired USFS employee on the Nez/Clearwater whose father passed away & wants to leave a donation to a forestry-based organization in Idaho. Mary hasn’t heard anything but the donation will come in the mail.

l. Forestry Day at the Legislatures is Jan. 24th, Wednesday & John Lillehaug is putting this on. John said, the Legislators come for Lunch & visit. Displays will be set up. John said, he doesn’t need a lot of help.

6. Other Business:
a. VOTE ON CHARGING ACTIVE TREE FARMS $10 A YEAR.
Russ reminded the committee that as a certified program, we will be assessed by National ATFS a few of $10.00 per Tree Farm to help cover 3rd party auditing. We are required to have an economic plan in to them by 12-31-18 detailing how we will cover this cost and he suggested instituting a $10.00 annual fee to each Tree Farm. Detailed discussion by the committee ensued on this proposal. Consensus was that a fee system of some sort needs to be started. John Lillehaug believes if Tree Farmers are charged $10.00 per tree farm in his area, the tree farmers might opt out of the program. Doug Bradetich suggested we need to inform the Tree Farm members ahead. Erin Bradetich & Doug will inform tree farmers about the fee structure in the winter newsletter. Janet Funk thought there needs to be more incentive to belong to the tree farm. Russ will ask, if there’s any other options while he’s at the National Leadership Conference and report back at the April ITFC meeting. Janet moved to table the vote on charging the $10.00 until the meeting in April. Kurt Koetter seconded the motion, motion carried unanimously.
b. IFG TO CHANGE LANDOWNER CONTRIBUTIONS FOR CERTIFIED WOOD.
After the Forum, Russ will be addressing the SFI-SIC with the ITFP annual report. He will be requesting additional funding to help with rising administrative costs. Depending on the outcome, we may ask Idaho Forest Group to change their $5.00 per thousand-foot Tree Farm incentive from the current $4.50 Tree Farmer and $.50 state program to $4.00 Tree Farmer and $1.00 state program.

c. CHRIS SCHNEPF OF U of I EXTENSION THERE WILL BE LEAP UPDATES.
There needs to be more logger outreach to Landowners. There will be L.E.A.P. classes Tues, March 20th in Lewiston, Wed, March 21st in St. Maries, & Thurs, March 22nd in Sandpoint.
April 6th, UI Extension, Bonner County-Identifying Idaho Trees.

d. Next meeting date: Thursday, April 19, 2018

7. Adjourn
President Russ Hegedus adjourned the meeting at 12:05p.m. Sean Hammond moved the meeting be adjurned.

Respectfully Submitted,

Colleen Meek
ITFP Administrator

Meeting Minutes-October 19, 2017

IDAHO TREE FARM PROGRAM

Idaho Tree Farm Committee Meeting

9:30am- 12:00pm, Thursday, October 19th, 2017

University of Idaho Extension Office – Kootenai County

1808 N 3rd St. Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814

 

  • President Russ Hegedus called the meeting to order at 9:35 a.m. Those present for all or part of the meeting were:
    1. Andy Eckberg, ITFC District 1 Chair/IFG
    2. Jane Thornes, PLT
    3. Jim Thornes, Tree Farmer
    4. Steve Cuvala, ITFC Treasure/Tree Farmer
    5. Tim Schaffer, ITFC District 2 Chair/BLP
    6. Steve Funk, ITFC Past Chair/Tree Farmer
    7. Janet Funk, ILRCC/Tree Farmer
    8. Chris Schnepf, ITFC/U of I Extension
    9. Colleen Meek, ITF Administrator
    10. Kurt Koetter, Tree Farmer of the Year
    11. Dan Meyers, Tree Farmer
    12. Ken Homik, IDL
    13. Russ Hegedus, ITFC President/IFG
    14. Sean Hammond, Vice President/Tree Farmer
    15. Erin Bradetich, ITFC Communications/IFG
    16. Doug Bradetich, IFG
  • Anti-Trust Statement 
  •         Russ Hegedus reviewed the Anti-Trust Statement with the       Committee.
    • Minutes Q2
    •  Doug read the Minutes for Q2, there was one correction, instead of Wildlife it should have said, Wildfire Response Committee. Doug Bradetich moved minutes approved and Sean Hammond seconded the motion. Motion carried
    • Russ Hegedus introduced the new administrator, Colleen Meek to the committee. 
  • Review of July’s Treasurer’s Report
  • Kurt Koetter moved and Doug Bradetich seconded to approve the Treasurer’s report as presented. The motion carried unanimously.
    1. Steve Cuvala gave the Treasurer’s Report and Doug Bradetich reviewed the 2017 Budget against actual income and expenditures as of October 16, 2017. All expenses are in line. IFG stumpage premiums will be considerably less than expected this year, 8-9k rather than expected 15k, due to inclement weather. Cash balance is currently $30,215.85 in the positive. It was suggested by Steve Funk to get 3-4 more IOTFY signs coming with estimate around $500.00 each. Sean Hammond approved and Steve Funk seconded. Motion carried.
  • ILRCC (Idaho Lands Resource Coordinating Council) Report Updates  
  • Janet Funk no updates.
  • Communications Report 
  • Communications Chair Erin Bradetich updated the Committee on communication efforts with Tree Farmers. Erin Bradetich and Doug Bradetich are currently working on a Fall Newsletter for distribution near the end of October. There were about 100 post cards mailed out. When the post cards are received back to the Tree Farm, the post cards all should go to the appropriate District Chair.
  • Old Business
  • 501(c)3 Status (Russ Hegedus)
  • The paper work is on its way to Boise as soon as the check is written and mailed.
  • Fall Field Tour Review 
  • Annual Fall Tour Saturday, September 9, 2017 was well attended with 82 family, friends, quests gathered at the home of Kurt and Sandy Koetter, Idaho Outstanding Tree Farmers for 2017. The group toured their Wood Wizard Tree Farm with stops including PCT, fire proofing near the home, noxious weed control, and light commercial harvest. Kurt Koetter mentioned he would have liked see to some press release for more notation. Jane and Jim Thornes suggested more signs getting to the location of the Tree Farm. Jim will check with his sign maker-cost of signs with wording FORESTRY EVENT with an ARROW.
  • New Business:

PLT Report “It is: SFI” (Jane Thornes) E-unit, making it handy for teachers.PLT anticipates drops in PLT funding due to:

    1. The new E-units are ready for teachers. These units include lesson plans, student pages, and other supporting materials online. The standards pop up throughout the
    2. Project Learning Tree is settling in with new sponsor Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) having been transferred from American Forest Foundation (AFF). SFI and PLT are getting to know each other better at the national level. The next step will be for SFI Implementation Committees and State PLT program to get better acquainted.
  1. Secure Rural Schools law was not reauthorized. PLT had successfully competed for about $15,000 per year from those funds. That funding no longer exists and doesn’t look likely to return.
  2. Federal funding is uncertain right now and likely to decrease more over time. A large amount of current PLT funding comes from BLM and USFS in various ways.

Jane indicated she and PLT greatly appreciate the support of all their sponsors, including Idaho Tree Farm. If ITF would like to contribute to the 2018 program, they welcome knowing by 11/15, if that is possible, so they can get things in their draft budget in time for the Steering Committee meeting.

It was suggested that Idaho Tree Farm donate to PLT $200 sent to Betty Munis, director of  the Idaho Forest Products Commission. Tim Schaffer approved, Doug Bradetich second. Motioned carried.

  • Andy Eckberg indicated there have been letters recently sent to landowners and loggers regarding the assessment for the Idaho Forest Products Commission. He asked, how it is determined who receives these. Per Russ anyone that delivers logs to Idaho mills will receive the letter.
  • Outstanding Tree Farmer, Inspector and Logger of the Year Selections for 2018:
  • President Russ announced the following recipients, which will be announced at the ITFP annual meeting in Moscow in March, 2018.
  1. Tree Farm of the Year-Brian Kroetch
  2. Logger of the Year-Luke Peterson
  3. Inspector of the Year-Steve Cuvala

Russ also let the committee know the Wood Family did not make the selection for the Regional Tree Farmer of the Year, although they continue to be an outstanding example of excellent Tree Farm stewardship and public outreach.

  1. National Leadership Conference

Attending the 2018 National Leadership Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico will be Russ Hegedus & Sean Hammonds.

  1. Required/Optional Inspections Update

All National Sample Required Inspections have been assigned and most have been completed. District I have 2 left to complete. District II has 4 to complete. District III has completed all their required inspections.

Optional and Pioneer – District 11 has 14 pioneers and 4 optional inspections to complete. ATFS National has offered grants to assist in bringing Pioneers up to certified status. The Committee continues to discuss potential plans to complete these.

  1. New Tree Farms and 004 Form Completion Emailed Updates

Russ reminded Colleen when 004 inspection forms have been fully completed and signed by all required parties, the Administrator will enter them into the database. Confirmation of their entry into the database will be sent via email to the Inspecting Forester and Landowner (if they’ve provided an email). A physical letter will also be sent to the Landowner’s mailing address recognizing their Tree Farm’s recertification to the updated standards. The new Tree Farms will receive welcome certificate and a letter of explanation.

  1. Laptop donated by Idaho Forest Group for the administrator.

Russ informed the committee that IFG donated a laptop computer to the ITFC. IFG  will provide the IT services for the computer. Idaho Tree Farm bought the software for the laptop.

 Website:

Changed to GodwinMarketing Communications LLC (Candace Godwin) from Host  Gator Domain, there is only a $12.00 difference per year. Candace Godwin is out of Coeur d’Alene.

  • Other Business:
  • Next meeting date: Thursday, January 18, 2017, at the U of I Extension Office in Coeur d’ Alene, ID at 9:30 a.m. 
  • Additional Program Funding 
  • Russ reviewed how Washington and Montana are currently adding ways to come  up with more monies for their programs. Washington is suggesting a set amount per Tree Farmer. Montana is on fee system by Timber Companies. He also indicated how important the Idaho Department of Lands is for our Idaho program. The IDL provides 50 percent chapter help in our field inspections and it would be difficult if not impossible to continue without their level of support. To prepare for the upcoming audit it was suggested the ITFP request a $12 to $15 donation from tree farmers. This was discussed by the committee, but tabled with no action.
  • U of I Research Nursery-Seedlings – Root Section
  • There’s a need for more representation on the Advisory Committee, with an aim to be able to bring the latest research for forest nursery stock. It was suggested that the administrator of the Tree Farm with the help of Janet Funk prepare a letter to request a position to sit on the Advisory Committee. If approved the ITFC will need to appoint a volunteer to sit on the committee. Dan Meyers said, they’re collecting Douglas Fir cones with seedlings with a grant with IFM at Boundary county.
  • Family Forest Landowners and Managers Conference & Exposition/Tree Farm Annual Meeting will be in Moscow March 26 & 27, 2018
  • ITFC will work on the Roster for the 2018 year in January meeting.
  • Inspector training will co-ordinate with Russ and Kurt.
  • Adjourn
  • President Russ Hegedus adjourned the meeting at 11:34 a.m.
  • Respectfully Submitted,
  • Colleen Meek
  • ITFP Administrator